Menu:

History of the Catholic Church - Wikipedia


Although the earliest Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland is unconfirmed, by the 16th century priests sometimes accompanied European explorers and fishermen who came to Newfoundland. The first known Roman Catholics who settled on the island were colonists who came to Lord Baltimore's Ferryland colony in the 1620s. Father Anthony Pole (alias Smith) came to the colony in 1627 and was the first Roman Catholic priest to reside in British North America. The Ferryland colony was not intended solely for Catholics, and Anglican priests also served these early settlers. However, this initial presence of Roman Catholicism in Newfoundland was short-lived as the colony was abandoned in 1629.

The arrival of large numbers of Irish immigrants during the 18th century reinforced the Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland. By the 1780s, the Irish constituted close to half of the permanent inhabitants of the island. Most of them settled between Placentia Bay and Conception Bay, thus establishing the strong Irish Catholic presence that has since characterised the Avalon peninsula.

British rule in Newfoundland created difficulties for the Roman Catholics. A 1729 decree granted a liberty of conscience to all 'except Papists,' and the governorship of Richard Dorrill in 1755 was a particularly harsh period, since he enforced fines, deported Catholics, and advocated the destruction of Catholic property. However, by 1779 full religious liberty was granted to all people in Newfoundland.

The Irish uprising in 1798 created tensions which culminated in 1800 with the revolt of United Irish sympathizers in the St. John's garrison. O'Donel's authority ensured that this unrest did not spread. However his policy of appeasement and pacification contrasted with the increasingly independent attitude of subsequent bishops. Irish migration to Newfoundland peaked around 1815, and the activity of priests throughout the island brought new converts to the Church. Although the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1829, restrictions on Catholics in public life persisted in Newfoundland even after the introduction of representative government in 1832.

The episcopate of Bishop Michael Anthony Fleming began in 1829. Under his authority the Roman Catholic Church moved away from its missionary roots as new parishes were established and existing parishes continued to grow. Fleming introduced the Presentation Sisters and the Sisters of Mercy, and began the construction of the Cathedral (now the Basilica) of St. John the Baptist in St. John's. The cathedral was not finished until 1855, under Fleming's successor Bishop John Thomas Mullock.

In 1843 Catholic and Protestant schooling was effectively separated, reflecting the educational divisions that culminated in a fully denominational school system in 1874 and which lasted until the 1990s. It was during Fleming's episcopate that the Vicariate of Newfoundland became a diocese in 1847. This growing independence was further reinforced with the introduction of responsible government in 1855, which the Church had strongly supported.

Quick Fact Sources include www.adherents.com , www.bbc.co.uk/religion , The Oxford Handbook of Global Religions (2006), The Encyclopedia of Religion (2005), the Religious Movements Page at the University of Virginia , The Cambridge Illustrated History of Religions (2002), and the Encyclopedia of World Religions (1999).

As of 2009, it is impossible to formally defect from the Roman Catholic Church. However, public or "notorious defection" (as it is called in the Church's Canon Law) from the Catholic Church is of course possible, as is expressly recognised in the Code of Canon Law. Even private defection (through "heresy", "schism", or "apostasy") is subject to the penalty of excommunication laid down in Canon 1364 of the Code of Canon Law.

Unlike most Christian denominations, for which finding out what they actually believe can be as hard as nailing jelly to a wall, Roman Catholicism has the Catechism of the Catholic Church , which all Catholics are meant to agree to (they don't all, but it's the official statement of beliefs). Other statements by influential Catholics (such as the Pope ) are not normally strict Roman Catholic doctrine — they are about as important as statements made in a press conference by a President or Prime Minister.

On the other hand the Roman Catholic Church believes that it is God's representative on earth and, as such, God would not allow it to have persistently wrong teachings for a prolonged period of time (something known as Magisterial Infallibility). In short when the Roman Catholic Church has historically claimed something is morally wrong there is no room for movement (which is why their teachings on Contraception are so screwed up).

Since the Second Vatican Council the Church has generally avoided clear moral statements, instead creating the illusion of unity through ambiguous essays that can be interpreted differently by conflicting groups within Catholicism. [4] For instance, imprecise writing has persuaded sections of the media that the Roman Catholic Church will change its teachings on the sinfulness of gay sex and extramarital sex. The public (including many lay Catholics) don't seem to understand how unlikely this would be [5] ( Pope Francis , on the other hand, has been very clear on this point). [6]

The Roman Catholic Church teaches deontological ethics . This means that what is important is following the rules set down by the Church rather than, as utilitarianism would suggest, working out what would do the most good. The idea behind this is twofold; firstly that by providing clear guidelines it means it is possible to do the right thing with incomplete information, and secondly that even if the humans that make up the Roman Catholic Church are flawed, the Church itself is far better at reasoning than any one person and so can do better than you can by yourself.

Roman Catholics also believe in original sin — that no one is perfect and no one gets it right all the time. But you do the best you can, confess your sins, and then carry out the penance to restore what went wrong so you can continue on.

Although the earliest Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland is unconfirmed, by the 16th century priests sometimes accompanied European explorers and fishermen who came to Newfoundland. The first known Roman Catholics who settled on the island were colonists who came to Lord Baltimore's Ferryland colony in the 1620s. Father Anthony Pole (alias Smith) came to the colony in 1627 and was the first Roman Catholic priest to reside in British North America. The Ferryland colony was not intended solely for Catholics, and Anglican priests also served these early settlers. However, this initial presence of Roman Catholicism in Newfoundland was short-lived as the colony was abandoned in 1629.

The arrival of large numbers of Irish immigrants during the 18th century reinforced the Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland. By the 1780s, the Irish constituted close to half of the permanent inhabitants of the island. Most of them settled between Placentia Bay and Conception Bay, thus establishing the strong Irish Catholic presence that has since characterised the Avalon peninsula.

British rule in Newfoundland created difficulties for the Roman Catholics. A 1729 decree granted a liberty of conscience to all 'except Papists,' and the governorship of Richard Dorrill in 1755 was a particularly harsh period, since he enforced fines, deported Catholics, and advocated the destruction of Catholic property. However, by 1779 full religious liberty was granted to all people in Newfoundland.

The Irish uprising in 1798 created tensions which culminated in 1800 with the revolt of United Irish sympathizers in the St. John's garrison. O'Donel's authority ensured that this unrest did not spread. However his policy of appeasement and pacification contrasted with the increasingly independent attitude of subsequent bishops. Irish migration to Newfoundland peaked around 1815, and the activity of priests throughout the island brought new converts to the Church. Although the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1829, restrictions on Catholics in public life persisted in Newfoundland even after the introduction of representative government in 1832.

The episcopate of Bishop Michael Anthony Fleming began in 1829. Under his authority the Roman Catholic Church moved away from its missionary roots as new parishes were established and existing parishes continued to grow. Fleming introduced the Presentation Sisters and the Sisters of Mercy, and began the construction of the Cathedral (now the Basilica) of St. John the Baptist in St. John's. The cathedral was not finished until 1855, under Fleming's successor Bishop John Thomas Mullock.

In 1843 Catholic and Protestant schooling was effectively separated, reflecting the educational divisions that culminated in a fully denominational school system in 1874 and which lasted until the 1990s. It was during Fleming's episcopate that the Vicariate of Newfoundland became a diocese in 1847. This growing independence was further reinforced with the introduction of responsible government in 1855, which the Church had strongly supported.

Quick Fact Sources include www.adherents.com , www.bbc.co.uk/religion , The Oxford Handbook of Global Religions (2006), The Encyclopedia of Religion (2005), the Religious Movements Page at the University of Virginia , The Cambridge Illustrated History of Religions (2002), and the Encyclopedia of World Religions (1999).

Although the earliest Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland is unconfirmed, by the 16th century priests sometimes accompanied European explorers and fishermen who came to Newfoundland. The first known Roman Catholics who settled on the island were colonists who came to Lord Baltimore's Ferryland colony in the 1620s. Father Anthony Pole (alias Smith) came to the colony in 1627 and was the first Roman Catholic priest to reside in British North America. The Ferryland colony was not intended solely for Catholics, and Anglican priests also served these early settlers. However, this initial presence of Roman Catholicism in Newfoundland was short-lived as the colony was abandoned in 1629.

The arrival of large numbers of Irish immigrants during the 18th century reinforced the Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland. By the 1780s, the Irish constituted close to half of the permanent inhabitants of the island. Most of them settled between Placentia Bay and Conception Bay, thus establishing the strong Irish Catholic presence that has since characterised the Avalon peninsula.

British rule in Newfoundland created difficulties for the Roman Catholics. A 1729 decree granted a liberty of conscience to all 'except Papists,' and the governorship of Richard Dorrill in 1755 was a particularly harsh period, since he enforced fines, deported Catholics, and advocated the destruction of Catholic property. However, by 1779 full religious liberty was granted to all people in Newfoundland.

The Irish uprising in 1798 created tensions which culminated in 1800 with the revolt of United Irish sympathizers in the St. John's garrison. O'Donel's authority ensured that this unrest did not spread. However his policy of appeasement and pacification contrasted with the increasingly independent attitude of subsequent bishops. Irish migration to Newfoundland peaked around 1815, and the activity of priests throughout the island brought new converts to the Church. Although the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1829, restrictions on Catholics in public life persisted in Newfoundland even after the introduction of representative government in 1832.

The episcopate of Bishop Michael Anthony Fleming began in 1829. Under his authority the Roman Catholic Church moved away from its missionary roots as new parishes were established and existing parishes continued to grow. Fleming introduced the Presentation Sisters and the Sisters of Mercy, and began the construction of the Cathedral (now the Basilica) of St. John the Baptist in St. John's. The cathedral was not finished until 1855, under Fleming's successor Bishop John Thomas Mullock.

In 1843 Catholic and Protestant schooling was effectively separated, reflecting the educational divisions that culminated in a fully denominational school system in 1874 and which lasted until the 1990s. It was during Fleming's episcopate that the Vicariate of Newfoundland became a diocese in 1847. This growing independence was further reinforced with the introduction of responsible government in 1855, which the Church had strongly supported.

Although the earliest Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland is unconfirmed, by the 16th century priests sometimes accompanied European explorers and fishermen who came to Newfoundland. The first known Roman Catholics who settled on the island were colonists who came to Lord Baltimore's Ferryland colony in the 1620s. Father Anthony Pole (alias Smith) came to the colony in 1627 and was the first Roman Catholic priest to reside in British North America. The Ferryland colony was not intended solely for Catholics, and Anglican priests also served these early settlers. However, this initial presence of Roman Catholicism in Newfoundland was short-lived as the colony was abandoned in 1629.

The arrival of large numbers of Irish immigrants during the 18th century reinforced the Roman Catholic presence in Newfoundland. By the 1780s, the Irish constituted close to half of the permanent inhabitants of the island. Most of them settled between Placentia Bay and Conception Bay, thus establishing the strong Irish Catholic presence that has since characterised the Avalon peninsula.

British rule in Newfoundland created difficulties for the Roman Catholics. A 1729 decree granted a liberty of conscience to all 'except Papists,' and the governorship of Richard Dorrill in 1755 was a particularly harsh period, since he enforced fines, deported Catholics, and advocated the destruction of Catholic property. However, by 1779 full religious liberty was granted to all people in Newfoundland.

The Irish uprising in 1798 created tensions which culminated in 1800 with the revolt of United Irish sympathizers in the St. John's garrison. O'Donel's authority ensured that this unrest did not spread. However his policy of appeasement and pacification contrasted with the increasingly independent attitude of subsequent bishops. Irish migration to Newfoundland peaked around 1815, and the activity of priests throughout the island brought new converts to the Church. Although the Roman Catholic Emancipation Act was passed by the British Parliament in 1829, restrictions on Catholics in public life persisted in Newfoundland even after the introduction of representative government in 1832.

The episcopate of Bishop Michael Anthony Fleming began in 1829. Under his authority the Roman Catholic Church moved away from its missionary roots as new parishes were established and existing parishes continued to grow. Fleming introduced the Presentation Sisters and the Sisters of Mercy, and began the construction of the Cathedral (now the Basilica) of St. John the Baptist in St. John's. The cathedral was not finished until 1855, under Fleming's successor Bishop John Thomas Mullock.

In 1843 Catholic and Protestant schooling was effectively separated, reflecting the educational divisions that culminated in a fully denominational school system in 1874 and which lasted until the 1990s. It was during Fleming's episcopate that the Vicariate of Newfoundland became a diocese in 1847. This growing independence was further reinforced with the introduction of responsible government in 1855, which the Church had strongly supported.

Quick Fact Sources include www.adherents.com , www.bbc.co.uk/religion , The Oxford Handbook of Global Religions (2006), The Encyclopedia of Religion (2005), the Religious Movements Page at the University of Virginia , The Cambridge Illustrated History of Religions (2002), and the Encyclopedia of World Religions (1999).

As of 2009, it is impossible to formally defect from the Roman Catholic Church. However, public or "notorious defection" (as it is called in the Church's Canon Law) from the Catholic Church is of course possible, as is expressly recognised in the Code of Canon Law. Even private defection (through "heresy", "schism", or "apostasy") is subject to the penalty of excommunication laid down in Canon 1364 of the Code of Canon Law.

Unlike most Christian denominations, for which finding out what they actually believe can be as hard as nailing jelly to a wall, Roman Catholicism has the Catechism of the Catholic Church , which all Catholics are meant to agree to (they don't all, but it's the official statement of beliefs). Other statements by influential Catholics (such as the Pope ) are not normally strict Roman Catholic doctrine — they are about as important as statements made in a press conference by a President or Prime Minister.

On the other hand the Roman Catholic Church believes that it is God's representative on earth and, as such, God would not allow it to have persistently wrong teachings for a prolonged period of time (something known as Magisterial Infallibility). In short when the Roman Catholic Church has historically claimed something is morally wrong there is no room for movement (which is why their teachings on Contraception are so screwed up).

Since the Second Vatican Council the Church has generally avoided clear moral statements, instead creating the illusion of unity through ambiguous essays that can be interpreted differently by conflicting groups within Catholicism. [4] For instance, imprecise writing has persuaded sections of the media that the Roman Catholic Church will change its teachings on the sinfulness of gay sex and extramarital sex. The public (including many lay Catholics) don't seem to understand how unlikely this would be [5] ( Pope Francis , on the other hand, has been very clear on this point). [6]

The Roman Catholic Church teaches deontological ethics . This means that what is important is following the rules set down by the Church rather than, as utilitarianism would suggest, working out what would do the most good. The idea behind this is twofold; firstly that by providing clear guidelines it means it is possible to do the right thing with incomplete information, and secondly that even if the humans that make up the Roman Catholic Church are flawed, the Church itself is far better at reasoning than any one person and so can do better than you can by yourself.

Roman Catholics also believe in original sin — that no one is perfect and no one gets it right all the time. But you do the best you can, confess your sins, and then carry out the penance to restore what went wrong so you can continue on.

The Catholic Church , also known as the Roman Catholic Church , is the largest Christian church , with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide. As one of the ...

22.01.2018  · Roman Catholicism: Roman Catholicism, Christian church that has been the decisive spiritual force in the history of Western civilization.

The history of the Catholic Church begins with the teachings of Jesus Christ (c. 4 BC – c. AD 30), who lived in the Herodian Tetrarchy (later formed into the Roman ...

20.01.2018  · News about the Roman Catholic Church , with commentary and archival information from The New York Times.

Catholic News and Information center for Catholics and All People of God, to Help them Deepen their understanding of Our Catholic Faith. All about the world from a ...

The Roman Catholic Church claims to have started in Matthew 16:18 when Christ supposedly appointed Peter as the first Pope. However, …


51YYQZgTurL