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School building | Peanuts Wiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia


The school building is a minor character, and probably the most unusual character, in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz . The reader is able to see thought bubbles coming from the school building, it seems to listen to what Sally Brown says, and Sally seems to understand it too, a strong relationship eventually develops between the two characters.

The school building is a difficult character to categorize. It is a real location, therefore it is not an obviously imaginary character like the Red Baron or the Great Pumpkin . However, although it thinks and feels it is not a "living character" like the children and animals in the strip.

In the strip from July 7, 1971 , Sally shouts at the school building, taunting it by saying that it is summer vacation and, consequently, the school can do nothing to harm her. In the following days strip, she runs up to the building and kicks it. The school building does not react in any way to Sally's actions in either of those strips.

In a series of strips that originally ran between September 9 and September 15, 1974, Sally is unable to go to school because she is ill. She asks her brother Charlie Brown to talk to the school building on her behalf. The boy very reluctantly does so, feeling foolish the entire time. Someone sees him standing near to the building, assumes that he is writing on it and reports him to the principal. To his great embarrassment, Charlie Brown has to tell the principal the real reason why he was standing close to the building.

Having recovered from her illness and returned to school, in the strip from September 17, 1974, Sally thanks the building for having changed her life and stopped her from dreading coming to school. The school building responds with a thought bubble which says, "I can't believe it. Somebody loves me!"

In subsequent strips Sally continues to hold one-sided conversations with the building, the building occasionally finds ways to communicate in return, and Sally somehow understands it. Sally develops a relationship with the building, always talks to it, and shares her feelings with it.

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The school building is a minor character, and probably the most unusual character, in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz . The reader is able to see thought bubbles coming from the school building, it seems to listen to what Sally Brown says, and Sally seems to understand it too, a strong relationship eventually develops between the two characters.

The school building is a difficult character to categorize. It is a real location, therefore it is not an obviously imaginary character like the Red Baron or the Great Pumpkin . However, although it thinks and feels it is not a "living character" like the children and animals in the strip.

In the strip from July 7, 1971 , Sally shouts at the school building, taunting it by saying that it is summer vacation and, consequently, the school can do nothing to harm her. In the following days strip, she runs up to the building and kicks it. The school building does not react in any way to Sally's actions in either of those strips.

In a series of strips that originally ran between September 9 and September 15, 1974, Sally is unable to go to school because she is ill. She asks her brother Charlie Brown to talk to the school building on her behalf. The boy very reluctantly does so, feeling foolish the entire time. Someone sees him standing near to the building, assumes that he is writing on it and reports him to the principal. To his great embarrassment, Charlie Brown has to tell the principal the real reason why he was standing close to the building.

Having recovered from her illness and returned to school, in the strip from September 17, 1974, Sally thanks the building for having changed her life and stopped her from dreading coming to school. The school building responds with a thought bubble which says, "I can't believe it. Somebody loves me!"

In subsequent strips Sally continues to hold one-sided conversations with the building, the building occasionally finds ways to communicate in return, and Sally somehow understands it. Sally develops a relationship with the building, always talks to it, and shares her feelings with it.

The school building is a minor character, and probably the most unusual character, in the Peanuts comic strip by Charles M. Schulz . The reader is able to see thought bubbles coming from the school building, it seems to listen to what Sally Brown says, and Sally seems to understand it too, a strong relationship eventually develops between the two characters.

The school building is a difficult character to categorize. It is a real location, therefore it is not an obviously imaginary character like the Red Baron or the Great Pumpkin . However, although it thinks and feels it is not a "living character" like the children and animals in the strip.

In the strip from July 7, 1971 , Sally shouts at the school building, taunting it by saying that it is summer vacation and, consequently, the school can do nothing to harm her. In the following days strip, she runs up to the building and kicks it. The school building does not react in any way to Sally's actions in either of those strips.

In a series of strips that originally ran between September 9 and September 15, 1974, Sally is unable to go to school because she is ill. She asks her brother Charlie Brown to talk to the school building on her behalf. The boy very reluctantly does so, feeling foolish the entire time. Someone sees him standing near to the building, assumes that he is writing on it and reports him to the principal. To his great embarrassment, Charlie Brown has to tell the principal the real reason why he was standing close to the building.

Having recovered from her illness and returned to school, in the strip from September 17, 1974, Sally thanks the building for having changed her life and stopped her from dreading coming to school. The school building responds with a thought bubble which says, "I can't believe it. Somebody loves me!"

In subsequent strips Sally continues to hold one-sided conversations with the building, the building occasionally finds ways to communicate in return, and Sally somehow understands it. Sally develops a relationship with the building, always talks to it, and shares her feelings with it.

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Like hundreds of other school districts across the country , Craneville Elementary is facing a student body that is more allergic to peanuts than ever before. “I have never seen anything like this,” says Bevan, a 25-year teaching veteran whose 489-student elementary school includes seven with peanut allergies this year. “These allergies came out of nowhere.” To protect vulnerable students, Craneville and many other schools are being forced to establish what educators are calling “peanut-free zones” — areas in the cafeteria and throughout the school where nut products are banned; some schools are going nut-free altogether.

According to the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network, peanut allergies more than doubled between 1997 and 2002 in children under 5 and are now estimated to affect more than 1% of school age children. “It is like being in a minefield,” says Dr. Scott Sicherer, an associate professor of pediatrics, allergy and immunology at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

Researchers don’t yet know why these allergies are blooming, but some experts think premature exposure to nut-based products in infancy may be to blame. Others believe the link is genetic. Still others cite the hygiene hypothesis — the idea that more and more parents are oversanitizing their kids with antibacterial agents, causing their immune systems to become more susceptible to allergies.

I – being brought up in a town/region/country where exposure to such things was more or less taken for granted (as were the attendant bumps, breaks and trips to the hospital) – go along with the hygiene hypothesis; MRSA is, of course, the most widely-known, to date, outcome. I’m sure super-strains of everything from Dengue to TB will scythe their way through our children, by and by. Grit is a good thing.

The former hypoethsis isn’t a bad one either, though: baby food is still baby food but, between the two towns in which I live (Bethlehem, Pa. and New York City), I see more than a sensible degree of parents pushing strollers containing toddlers eating shit that just isn’t food. The soy and high-fructose corn syrup in that stuff is probably doing God-knows-what to those kids.

There is, however, a social gradient to that sort of thing. Some decent social policy work and we might determing that social gradient, in the US, and perhaps even get a policy response. None of which will help kids whose lives are threatened by nuts, more-and-more. I’d also be interested to see someone track these kids and see how the percentage of those who mature out of the allergy changes (or not).


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