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Casey, Crime Photographer - Wikipedia


Police who investigated the disappearance of Casey Anthony's two-year-old daughter admitted today that they overlooked a Google search for 'fool-proof' suffocation on the day the girl was last seen alive.

Captain Angelo Nieves said on Sunday that his office's computer investigator missed the June 16, 2008 Internet search.

It is not known who performed the search but it was allegedly done with a browser primarily used by the two-year-old's mother, Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of the girl's murder in 2011.

Anthony's attorneys argued during trial that Casey Anthony helped her father, George Anthony, cover up the girl's drowning in the family pool.

WKMG reports that sheriff's investigators pulled 17 vague entries only from the computer's Internet Explorer browser, not the Mozilla Firefox browser commonly used by Casey Anthony. More than 1,200 Firefox entries, including the suffocation search, were overlooked.

Whoever conducted the Google search looked for the term 'fool-proof suffication', misspelling 'suffocation', and then clicked on an article about suicide that discussed taking poison and putting a bag over one's head.

Police who investigated the disappearance of Casey Anthony's two-year-old daughter admitted today that they overlooked a Google search for 'fool-proof' suffocation on the day the girl was last seen alive.

Captain Angelo Nieves said on Sunday that his office's computer investigator missed the June 16, 2008 Internet search.

It is not known who performed the search but it was allegedly done with a browser primarily used by the two-year-old's mother, Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of the girl's murder in 2011.

Anthony's attorneys argued during trial that Casey Anthony helped her father, George Anthony, cover up the girl's drowning in the family pool.

WKMG reports that sheriff's investigators pulled 17 vague entries only from the computer's Internet Explorer browser, not the Mozilla Firefox browser commonly used by Casey Anthony. More than 1,200 Firefox entries, including the suffocation search, were overlooked.

Whoever conducted the Google search looked for the term 'fool-proof suffication', misspelling 'suffocation', and then clicked on an article about suicide that discussed taking poison and putting a bag over one's head.

Casey, Crime Photographer , known by a variety of titles on radio (aka Crime Photographer , Flashgun Casey , Casey, Press Photographer ) was a media franchise from the 1930s to the 1960s. The character was the creation of novelist George Harmon Coxe . Casey was featured in the pulp magazine , Black Mask , novels, comic books, radio, film, television and legitimate theatre. [3]

Jack "Flashgun" Casey, was a crime photographer for the newspaper The Morning Express . With the help of reporter Ann Williams (best remembered portrayed by Jan Miner , Palmolive's "Madge"), he solved crimes and recounted his stories to friends at the Blue Note, their favorite tavern and jazz club where the Archie Bleyer Orchestra [4] and the Teddy Wilson Trio were featured. [4]

Begun as over 20 popular short stories in Black Mask , there were films and novels before the stories were brought to radio under various names. The series aired on CBS. The radio show was sustained by the network when a sponsor could not be found. Sponsors of the show include Anchor Hocking , Toni home permanents , Toni Shampoo and Philip Morris . [4]

"Flashgun" Casey was featured in 21 short stories in Black Mask , [7] a popular pulp magazine of the time. Collections of these stories were published in anthology form as well. Coxe wrote five novels featuring Casey from the 1930s to the 1960s. Two films Women Are Trouble and Here's Flash Casey were produced in the 1930s. A four-part Marvel Comics tie-in to the radio show was published in the 1940s.

Darrin McGavin commented, "The cast of Crime Photographer didn’t go down fighting. They took off for the hills. It was so bad that it was never re-run, and that’s saying something when you recall the caliber of television programs in those days." [8]

Flashgun Casey , the character, was first penned by former newspaperman and advertising executive, George Harmon Coxe, Jr., in the March 1934 issue of Black Mask , the legendary--and influential--early Pulp magazine. Coxe relates that he had read and enjoyed the fiction exploits of reporters, but couldn't help wondering who was most at risk during these exploits--the reporter or his cameraman. "So why not give the cameraman his due? If the reporter could be a glamorous figure in fiction, why not the guy up front who took - and still does take - the pictures?"

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspapers and magazines.

A haunting thread of melody leads Flashgun Casey, ace cameraman of the Express, to the trail of a group of Axis agents in " The Lost Melody ," third complete episode in the KGLO-CBS series "Flashgun Casey," on Wednesday at 10:30 P.M.

A musician disappears and his fiance enlists Casey's aid to f nd him. The trail leads only to blind alleys until Flashgun hears a song-and then things begin to POP, much to the discomfiture 0f a couple of Hitler's stooges.

Eight coats of ordinary house paint is the murder weapon in " The Case of the Painted Walls "exciting episode in the "Plashgun Casey"' series Wednesday on KGLO-CBS at 10:30 p.m.
A noted author dies after his apartment is freshly painted. Flashgun Casey, on a picture-assignment for his paper, discovers the who and why of the ingenious paint crime.

43-08-11 Findlay Courier
A flicker of fear that crosses a man's face when his picture is the clue that leads Flashgun Casey to an ingenious killer in " Murder Comes In Threes " on the CBS' "Flashgun Casey" series Wednesday at 11:30 p. m.

43-08-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette

"Flashgun Casey" previously heard on Wednesday , moves to Thursday this week on KGLO-CBS at 10:30 p. m.
"Flashgun Casey" dramatizes the adventures of a press photographer with a knack for uncovering mysteries — and solving them. Jim Backus plays "Flashgun" and Jone Allison is heard as Ann Williams, lovely girl reporter who accompanies Casey on his adventures.

Police who investigated the disappearance of Casey Anthony's two-year-old daughter admitted today that they overlooked a Google search for 'fool-proof' suffocation on the day the girl was last seen alive.

Captain Angelo Nieves said on Sunday that his office's computer investigator missed the June 16, 2008 Internet search.

It is not known who performed the search but it was allegedly done with a browser primarily used by the two-year-old's mother, Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of the girl's murder in 2011.

Anthony's attorneys argued during trial that Casey Anthony helped her father, George Anthony, cover up the girl's drowning in the family pool.

WKMG reports that sheriff's investigators pulled 17 vague entries only from the computer's Internet Explorer browser, not the Mozilla Firefox browser commonly used by Casey Anthony. More than 1,200 Firefox entries, including the suffocation search, were overlooked.

Whoever conducted the Google search looked for the term 'fool-proof suffication', misspelling 'suffocation', and then clicked on an article about suicide that discussed taking poison and putting a bag over one's head.

Casey, Crime Photographer , known by a variety of titles on radio (aka Crime Photographer , Flashgun Casey , Casey, Press Photographer ) was a media franchise from the 1930s to the 1960s. The character was the creation of novelist George Harmon Coxe . Casey was featured in the pulp magazine , Black Mask , novels, comic books, radio, film, television and legitimate theatre. [3]

Jack "Flashgun" Casey, was a crime photographer for the newspaper The Morning Express . With the help of reporter Ann Williams (best remembered portrayed by Jan Miner , Palmolive's "Madge"), he solved crimes and recounted his stories to friends at the Blue Note, their favorite tavern and jazz club where the Archie Bleyer Orchestra [4] and the Teddy Wilson Trio were featured. [4]

Begun as over 20 popular short stories in Black Mask , there were films and novels before the stories were brought to radio under various names. The series aired on CBS. The radio show was sustained by the network when a sponsor could not be found. Sponsors of the show include Anchor Hocking , Toni home permanents , Toni Shampoo and Philip Morris . [4]

"Flashgun" Casey was featured in 21 short stories in Black Mask , [7] a popular pulp magazine of the time. Collections of these stories were published in anthology form as well. Coxe wrote five novels featuring Casey from the 1930s to the 1960s. Two films Women Are Trouble and Here's Flash Casey were produced in the 1930s. A four-part Marvel Comics tie-in to the radio show was published in the 1940s.

Darrin McGavin commented, "The cast of Crime Photographer didn’t go down fighting. They took off for the hills. It was so bad that it was never re-run, and that’s saying something when you recall the caliber of television programs in those days." [8]

Flashgun Casey , the character, was first penned by former newspaperman and advertising executive, George Harmon Coxe, Jr., in the March 1934 issue of Black Mask , the legendary--and influential--early Pulp magazine. Coxe relates that he had read and enjoyed the fiction exploits of reporters, but couldn't help wondering who was most at risk during these exploits--the reporter or his cameraman. "So why not give the cameraman his due? If the reporter could be a glamorous figure in fiction, why not the guy up front who took - and still does take - the pictures?"

Notes on Provenances:

The most helpful provenances were newspapers and magazines.

A haunting thread of melody leads Flashgun Casey, ace cameraman of the Express, to the trail of a group of Axis agents in " The Lost Melody ," third complete episode in the KGLO-CBS series "Flashgun Casey," on Wednesday at 10:30 P.M.

A musician disappears and his fiance enlists Casey's aid to f nd him. The trail leads only to blind alleys until Flashgun hears a song-and then things begin to POP, much to the discomfiture 0f a couple of Hitler's stooges.

Eight coats of ordinary house paint is the murder weapon in " The Case of the Painted Walls "exciting episode in the "Plashgun Casey"' series Wednesday on KGLO-CBS at 10:30 p.m.
A noted author dies after his apartment is freshly painted. Flashgun Casey, on a picture-assignment for his paper, discovers the who and why of the ingenious paint crime.

43-08-11 Findlay Courier
A flicker of fear that crosses a man's face when his picture is the clue that leads Flashgun Casey to an ingenious killer in " Murder Comes In Threes " on the CBS' "Flashgun Casey" series Wednesday at 11:30 p. m.

43-08-12 Mason City Globe-Gazette

"Flashgun Casey" previously heard on Wednesday , moves to Thursday this week on KGLO-CBS at 10:30 p. m.
"Flashgun Casey" dramatizes the adventures of a press photographer with a knack for uncovering mysteries — and solving them. Jim Backus plays "Flashgun" and Jone Allison is heard as Ann Williams, lovely girl reporter who accompanies Casey on his adventures.

In an explosive interview for the Investigation Discovery series Casey Anthony: An American Crime , Casey’s dad and Caylee’s grandfather George Anthony speculated on what he thinks might have happened to 2-year-old Caylee, whose remains were found in December 2008, several months after she went missing.

George Anthony first discounted the theory offered by the defense at ‘tot mom”s infamous 2011 murder trial: That little Caylee drowned in her grandparents’ pool  at their Orlando home, and George Anthony helped dispose of the body.

In the interview on Investigation Discovery, which aired the final episode of the three-part series on Tuesday night, George said that claim was “a bunch of crap.”

I don’t believe (the drowning). That’s a bunch of bull to me. That’s too easy of a story to bring up ‘cause if that would’ve happened, I think my daughter would’ve at least had the common decency or common sense inside to call 911 and say something.

George said that what did believe: That Casey had given Caylee drugs, perhaps to help her sleep, and that the toddler died as a result.

George claims that Casey had access to prescription drugs like Xanax, a Benzodiazepine sedative, and when asked for its street name, he said it was “Zanny.”

Police who investigated the disappearance of Casey Anthony's two-year-old daughter admitted today that they overlooked a Google search for 'fool-proof' suffocation on the day the girl was last seen alive.

Captain Angelo Nieves said on Sunday that his office's computer investigator missed the June 16, 2008 Internet search.

It is not known who performed the search but it was allegedly done with a browser primarily used by the two-year-old's mother, Casey Anthony, who was acquitted of the girl's murder in 2011.

Anthony's attorneys argued during trial that Casey Anthony helped her father, George Anthony, cover up the girl's drowning in the family pool.

WKMG reports that sheriff's investigators pulled 17 vague entries only from the computer's Internet Explorer browser, not the Mozilla Firefox browser commonly used by Casey Anthony. More than 1,200 Firefox entries, including the suffocation search, were overlooked.

Whoever conducted the Google search looked for the term 'fool-proof suffication', misspelling 'suffocation', and then clicked on an article about suicide that discussed taking poison and putting a bag over one's head.

Casey, Crime Photographer , known by a variety of titles on radio (aka Crime Photographer , Flashgun Casey , Casey, Press Photographer ) was a media franchise from the 1930s to the 1960s. The character was the creation of novelist George Harmon Coxe . Casey was featured in the pulp magazine , Black Mask , novels, comic books, radio, film, television and legitimate theatre. [3]

Jack "Flashgun" Casey, was a crime photographer for the newspaper The Morning Express . With the help of reporter Ann Williams (best remembered portrayed by Jan Miner , Palmolive's "Madge"), he solved crimes and recounted his stories to friends at the Blue Note, their favorite tavern and jazz club where the Archie Bleyer Orchestra [4] and the Teddy Wilson Trio were featured. [4]

Begun as over 20 popular short stories in Black Mask , there were films and novels before the stories were brought to radio under various names. The series aired on CBS. The radio show was sustained by the network when a sponsor could not be found. Sponsors of the show include Anchor Hocking , Toni home permanents , Toni Shampoo and Philip Morris . [4]

"Flashgun" Casey was featured in 21 short stories in Black Mask , [7] a popular pulp magazine of the time. Collections of these stories were published in anthology form as well. Coxe wrote five novels featuring Casey from the 1930s to the 1960s. Two films Women Are Trouble and Here's Flash Casey were produced in the 1930s. A four-part Marvel Comics tie-in to the radio show was published in the 1940s.

Darrin McGavin commented, "The cast of Crime Photographer didn’t go down fighting. They took off for the hills. It was so bad that it was never re-run, and that’s saying something when you recall the caliber of television programs in those days." [8]


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