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JUSTICE LEAGUE – Official Movie Site - Own The Digital.


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Here’s a strange comic. It’s the return of Len Wein to the “Justice League of America,” and, as of today, if you check the DC website, this issue is still credited to Dwayne McDuffie. And the art is by Chris Cross, who, along with McDuffie, was one of the first batch of Milestone creators back in the early 1990s.

So you’d think that the recent appearance of the Milestone characters in this very JLA series would be a perfect time for a Cross/McDuffie reunion. But that’s not what this is at all.

Starbreaker has appeared before — in a 1972 “Justice League” issue and in a handful of other stories since. But you probably don’t remember him. I sure didn’t.

And here Len Wein gives us a bit about his background and a “twice-told tale” from the JLA casebook. Therefore, I assume this issue is a retelling of a “classic” Starbreaker story, but it’s one I’ve never read before. It certainly takes place in the distant past, with the Justice League as they were around the time Wein first wrote the series, when it was still Volume 1 and in the low triple digits, number-wise.

Like the “Final Crisis Secret Files” comic from a couple of weeks ago, this is basically an old-fashioned story with new art, and it’s kind of an interesting experiment. The dialogue seems ripped from an earlier era — and maybe it is literally taken verbatim from an older story, for all I know — which gives this comic a joyous silliness that makes it quite a bit of fun at times. And Aquaman (old-school Aquaman, not the dude with a harpoon-hand or beard or the one who’s an underwater swashbuckler) punches out the bad guy in the end.

Of course, he explains the source of his strength (you see, the ocean is heavy, and fish are stronger than they look, of course) as he’s punching out the bad guy, but that’s how things were done back in those days. And who else should punch out a space vampire like Starbreaker, if not a guy who can talk to fish and has the proportionate strength of one as well?

While the “Justice League” movie isn’t expected to be released on Blu-ray or digitally until February 2018, fans in Korea only have to wait a few more days, with the film set to be available for digital download on December 19.

Naver in Korea currently has the movie available for pre-order for its digital release on December 19, and as part of the promotion they have the first three minutes of the film available as a preview.

As those of you who have seen the film know, the first three minutes of the film start with Henry Cavill as Superman talking to a young boy who is filming the impromptu interview on his smart phone.

Presented below is the 3-minute video in 720p HD quality. To watch it in full 1080p quality and to order the Korean release of “Justice League” for digital download, head to

In the aftermath of the battle, Bruce and Diana agree to setup a base of operations for the team, with room for more members. Diana steps back into the public spotlight as a hero; Barry acquires a job in Central City 's police department , impressing his father ; Victor continues to explore and enhance his abilities with his father in S.T.A.R. Labs; Arthur returns to Atlantis; and Superman resumes his life as reporter Clark Kent. In a post-credits scene , Lex Luthor escapes from Arkham Asylum and recruits Slade Wilson to form their own league.

Justice League held its world premiere in Beijing on October 26, 2017, [112] and was theatrically released in North America in standard, RealD 3D and IMAX on November 17, 2017. The film is scheduled to be released on Digital HD on February 13, 2018 and is scheduled to be released on Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D, 4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray and DVD on March 13, 2018. [113]

As of January 28, 2018 [update] , Justice League has grossed $228.1 million in the United States and Canada, and $427.8 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $655.9 million, against a production budget of $300 million. [3] It had a worldwide opening of $278.8 million, the 24th biggest of all-time . [114] [115] The estimated gross worldwide for the film to break even is around $750 million. [116]

Internationally, the film was projected to debut to $215–235 million for a worldwide opening of $325–355 million. [123] It made $8.5 million on its first day from nine countries, including South Korea, France and Brazil. [118] It ended up having a $185 million international debut from 65 countries, including $57.1 million from China, $9.8 million from the United Kingdom, $9.6 million from Mexico and $8.8 million from South Korea. The film broke a record in the Philippines with a debut of $1.12M (PHP 57.3M), making it the biggest industry opening day for a film there in 2017. [124] In Brazil, the film opened to $14.2 million, the biggest opening in the country's history. [114]

Richard Roeper of Chicago Sun-Times gave the film 3.5 out of 4 stars, praising the cast, especially Gadot, and saying "It's a putting-the-band-together origins movie, executed with great fun and energy." [129] Owen Gleiberman of Variety gave the film a positive review and wrote, " Justice League ... has been conceived, in each and every frame, to correct the sins of Batman v Superman . It's not just a sequel—it's an act of franchise penance. The movie... is never messy or bombastic. It's light and clean and simple (at times almost too simple), with razory repartee and combat duels that make a point of not going on for too long." [130]

The film's poster was nominated for "Best Action Poster" by the Golden Trailer Awards in June 2017. [133] In December 2017, Ezra Miller was nominated for "Best Comedic Performance" for his role as Barry Allen by the San Diego Film Critics Society . [134]

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Here’s a strange comic. It’s the return of Len Wein to the “Justice League of America,” and, as of today, if you check the DC website, this issue is still credited to Dwayne McDuffie. And the art is by Chris Cross, who, along with McDuffie, was one of the first batch of Milestone creators back in the early 1990s.

So you’d think that the recent appearance of the Milestone characters in this very JLA series would be a perfect time for a Cross/McDuffie reunion. But that’s not what this is at all.

Starbreaker has appeared before — in a 1972 “Justice League” issue and in a handful of other stories since. But you probably don’t remember him. I sure didn’t.

And here Len Wein gives us a bit about his background and a “twice-told tale” from the JLA casebook. Therefore, I assume this issue is a retelling of a “classic” Starbreaker story, but it’s one I’ve never read before. It certainly takes place in the distant past, with the Justice League as they were around the time Wein first wrote the series, when it was still Volume 1 and in the low triple digits, number-wise.

Like the “Final Crisis Secret Files” comic from a couple of weeks ago, this is basically an old-fashioned story with new art, and it’s kind of an interesting experiment. The dialogue seems ripped from an earlier era — and maybe it is literally taken verbatim from an older story, for all I know — which gives this comic a joyous silliness that makes it quite a bit of fun at times. And Aquaman (old-school Aquaman, not the dude with a harpoon-hand or beard or the one who’s an underwater swashbuckler) punches out the bad guy in the end.

Of course, he explains the source of his strength (you see, the ocean is heavy, and fish are stronger than they look, of course) as he’s punching out the bad guy, but that’s how things were done back in those days. And who else should punch out a space vampire like Starbreaker, if not a guy who can talk to fish and has the proportionate strength of one as well?

While the “Justice League” movie isn’t expected to be released on Blu-ray or digitally until February 2018, fans in Korea only have to wait a few more days, with the film set to be available for digital download on December 19.

Naver in Korea currently has the movie available for pre-order for its digital release on December 19, and as part of the promotion they have the first three minutes of the film available as a preview.

As those of you who have seen the film know, the first three minutes of the film start with Henry Cavill as Superman talking to a young boy who is filming the impromptu interview on his smart phone.

Presented below is the 3-minute video in 720p HD quality. To watch it in full 1080p quality and to order the Korean release of “Justice League” for digital download, head to

In the aftermath of the battle, Bruce and Diana agree to setup a base of operations for the team, with room for more members. Diana steps back into the public spotlight as a hero; Barry acquires a job in Central City 's police department , impressing his father ; Victor continues to explore and enhance his abilities with his father in S.T.A.R. Labs; Arthur returns to Atlantis; and Superman resumes his life as reporter Clark Kent. In a post-credits scene , Lex Luthor escapes from Arkham Asylum and recruits Slade Wilson to form their own league.

Justice League held its world premiere in Beijing on October 26, 2017, [112] and was theatrically released in North America in standard, RealD 3D and IMAX on November 17, 2017. The film is scheduled to be released on Digital HD on February 13, 2018 and is scheduled to be released on Blu-ray, Blu-ray 3D, 4K Ultra-HD Blu-ray and DVD on March 13, 2018. [113]

As of January 28, 2018 [update] , Justice League has grossed $228.1 million in the United States and Canada, and $427.8 million in other territories, for a worldwide total of $655.9 million, against a production budget of $300 million. [3] It had a worldwide opening of $278.8 million, the 24th biggest of all-time . [114] [115] The estimated gross worldwide for the film to break even is around $750 million. [116]

Internationally, the film was projected to debut to $215–235 million for a worldwide opening of $325–355 million. [123] It made $8.5 million on its first day from nine countries, including South Korea, France and Brazil. [118] It ended up having a $185 million international debut from 65 countries, including $57.1 million from China, $9.8 million from the United Kingdom, $9.6 million from Mexico and $8.8 million from South Korea. The film broke a record in the Philippines with a debut of $1.12M (PHP 57.3M), making it the biggest industry opening day for a film there in 2017. [124] In Brazil, the film opened to $14.2 million, the biggest opening in the country's history. [114]

Richard Roeper of Chicago Sun-Times gave the film 3.5 out of 4 stars, praising the cast, especially Gadot, and saying "It's a putting-the-band-together origins movie, executed with great fun and energy." [129] Owen Gleiberman of Variety gave the film a positive review and wrote, " Justice League ... has been conceived, in each and every frame, to correct the sins of Batman v Superman . It's not just a sequel—it's an act of franchise penance. The movie... is never messy or bombastic. It's light and clean and simple (at times almost too simple), with razory repartee and combat duels that make a point of not going on for too long." [130]

The film's poster was nominated for "Best Action Poster" by the Golden Trailer Awards in June 2017. [133] In December 2017, Ezra Miller was nominated for "Best Comedic Performance" for his role as Barry Allen by the San Diego Film Critics Society . [134]


In the Earth-1A universe, a similar universe to Earth-One , there is a team of the greatest superhero 's located on Earth called the Justice League ( JL or JLA ). Together they protect the Interplanetary Federation as well as the entire universe .

Much of the back-story concerning the formation of the Justice League of America is the same as in the parallel universe of Earth-One ; [2] with the exception of the date of formation. Instead of the date being early 1960, it was late 1968.

Originally, these heroes operated solely within their own respective territories. With the exception of their super-powered adversaries, they rarely interacted with other heroes. [3] [4] [5]

The Flash did his best to assure the citizens of Middleton that he would protect them from the Martians but only came under suspicion himself. As paranoia began to spread through Middleton, the Flash addressed the citizenry, at city hall, offering to bring in Superman .

The assembled champions divide up into groups to scour the world for Martian activity: Plastic Man, Jimmy Olsen, and the Blackhawks accidentally run afoul of Rip Hunter 's newly invented Time Sphere . Robotman, the Vigilante, Congo Bill, Congorilla, Lois Lane, and the Challengers have a near-encounter with Adam Strange and the Zeta-Beam . Finally, the remaining heroes discover Blanx and his men, and rescue the captive J'onn J'onzz.

After their success, Superman, Wonder Woman, Aquaman, Flash and the Manhunter discuss forming a club or a society to uphold Justice in the World. Batman says he’s not much of a joiner. As they discuss, the panic that was involved the fear that coming together as a team now might foster further global panic or concern over the Martians on earth, so they decide to wait six months or so. The reporters present also offer their oath of silence believing that global panic would not be good. Green Lantern has arrived by this time and joins in on the agreement vowing to keep this incident a secret. [7]

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Here’s a strange comic. It’s the return of Len Wein to the “Justice League of America,” and, as of today, if you check the DC website, this issue is still credited to Dwayne McDuffie. And the art is by Chris Cross, who, along with McDuffie, was one of the first batch of Milestone creators back in the early 1990s.

So you’d think that the recent appearance of the Milestone characters in this very JLA series would be a perfect time for a Cross/McDuffie reunion. But that’s not what this is at all.

Starbreaker has appeared before — in a 1972 “Justice League” issue and in a handful of other stories since. But you probably don’t remember him. I sure didn’t.

And here Len Wein gives us a bit about his background and a “twice-told tale” from the JLA casebook. Therefore, I assume this issue is a retelling of a “classic” Starbreaker story, but it’s one I’ve never read before. It certainly takes place in the distant past, with the Justice League as they were around the time Wein first wrote the series, when it was still Volume 1 and in the low triple digits, number-wise.

Like the “Final Crisis Secret Files” comic from a couple of weeks ago, this is basically an old-fashioned story with new art, and it’s kind of an interesting experiment. The dialogue seems ripped from an earlier era — and maybe it is literally taken verbatim from an older story, for all I know — which gives this comic a joyous silliness that makes it quite a bit of fun at times. And Aquaman (old-school Aquaman, not the dude with a harpoon-hand or beard or the one who’s an underwater swashbuckler) punches out the bad guy in the end.

Of course, he explains the source of his strength (you see, the ocean is heavy, and fish are stronger than they look, of course) as he’s punching out the bad guy, but that’s how things were done back in those days. And who else should punch out a space vampire like Starbreaker, if not a guy who can talk to fish and has the proportionate strength of one as well?

While the “Justice League” movie isn’t expected to be released on Blu-ray or digitally until February 2018, fans in Korea only have to wait a few more days, with the film set to be available for digital download on December 19.

Naver in Korea currently has the movie available for pre-order for its digital release on December 19, and as part of the promotion they have the first three minutes of the film available as a preview.

As those of you who have seen the film know, the first three minutes of the film start with Henry Cavill as Superman talking to a young boy who is filming the impromptu interview on his smart phone.

Presented below is the 3-minute video in 720p HD quality. To watch it in full 1080p quality and to order the Korean release of “Justice League” for digital download, head to

IGN uses cookies and other tracking technologies to customize online advertisements, and for other purposes. IGN supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles.

Here’s a strange comic. It’s the return of Len Wein to the “Justice League of America,” and, as of today, if you check the DC website, this issue is still credited to Dwayne McDuffie. And the art is by Chris Cross, who, along with McDuffie, was one of the first batch of Milestone creators back in the early 1990s.

So you’d think that the recent appearance of the Milestone characters in this very JLA series would be a perfect time for a Cross/McDuffie reunion. But that’s not what this is at all.

Starbreaker has appeared before — in a 1972 “Justice League” issue and in a handful of other stories since. But you probably don’t remember him. I sure didn’t.

And here Len Wein gives us a bit about his background and a “twice-told tale” from the JLA casebook. Therefore, I assume this issue is a retelling of a “classic” Starbreaker story, but it’s one I’ve never read before. It certainly takes place in the distant past, with the Justice League as they were around the time Wein first wrote the series, when it was still Volume 1 and in the low triple digits, number-wise.

Like the “Final Crisis Secret Files” comic from a couple of weeks ago, this is basically an old-fashioned story with new art, and it’s kind of an interesting experiment. The dialogue seems ripped from an earlier era — and maybe it is literally taken verbatim from an older story, for all I know — which gives this comic a joyous silliness that makes it quite a bit of fun at times. And Aquaman (old-school Aquaman, not the dude with a harpoon-hand or beard or the one who’s an underwater swashbuckler) punches out the bad guy in the end.

Of course, he explains the source of his strength (you see, the ocean is heavy, and fish are stronger than they look, of course) as he’s punching out the bad guy, but that’s how things were done back in those days. And who else should punch out a space vampire like Starbreaker, if not a guy who can talk to fish and has the proportionate strength of one as well?


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