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The Black Herald – Literary magazine / Revue de littérature


Soldiers of the Commune's National Guard killed two French army generals, and the Commune refused to accept the authority of the French government. The regular French Army suppressed the Commune during " La semaine sanglante " ("The Bloody Week") beginning on 21 May 1871. [7] Debates over the policies and outcome of the Commune had significant influence on the ideas of Karl Marx , who described it as an example of the " dictatorship of the proletariat ". [8]

In 1871 France was deeply divided between the large rural, Catholic and conservative population of the French countryside and the more republican and radical cities of Paris, Marseille, Lyon and a few others. In the first round of the 1869 parliamentary elections held under the French Empire, 4,438,000 had voted for the Bonapartist candidates supporting Napoleon III, while 3,350,000 had voted for the republican opposition. In Paris, however, the republican candidates dominated, winning 234,000 votes against 77,000 for the Bonapartists. [9]

Of the 2 million people in Paris in 1869, according to the official census, there were about 500,000 industrial workers, or fifteen per cent of all the industrial workers in France, plus another 300,000-400,000 workers in other enterprises. Only about 40,000 were employed in factories and large enterprises; most were employed in small industries in textiles, furniture and construction. There were also 115,000 servants and 45,000 concierges. In addition to the native French population, there were about 100,000 immigrant workers and political refugees, the largest number being from Italy and Poland. [9]

During the war and the siege of Paris , various members of the middle- and upper-classes departed the city; at the same time there was an influx of refugees from parts of France occupied by the Germans. The working class and immigrants suffered the most from the lack of industrial activity due to the war and the siege; they formed the bedrock of the Commune's popular support. [9]

The killing of journalist Victor Noir incensed Parisians, and the arrests of journalists critical of the Emperor did nothing to quiet the city. A coup was attempted in early 1870, but tensions eased significantly after the plebiscite in May . The war with Prussia, initiated by Napoleon III in July, was initially met with patriotic fervour. [13]

Paris is the traditional home of French radical movements. Revolutionaries had gone into the streets to oppose their governments during the 1789 French Revolution , the popular uprisings of July 1830 and June 1848 ; all were violently repressed by the government.

Issue #2 September 2011  – septembre 2011
160×220 -162 pages – 13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-03-7

Issue #1 January 2011  – janvier 2011
160×220 – 148 pages –  13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-02-0

Co-edited by Blandine Longre and Paul Stubbs, the magazine’s only aim is to publish original world writers, not necessarily linked in any way by ‘theme’ or ‘style’. Writing that we deem can withstand the test of time and might resist popularization – the dangers of instant literature for instant consumption. Writing that seems capable of escaping the vacuum of the epoch. Where the rupture of alternative mindscapes and nationalities exists, so too will The Black Herald .

Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day? Go to: Distributed Proofreaders

Authors: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   other  

Titles: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   other  

Languages with more than 50 books: Chinese   Danish   Dutch   English   Esperanto   Finnish   French   German   Greek   Hungarian   Italian   Latin   Portuguese   Spanish   Swedish   Tagalog  

Special Categories: Audio Book, computer-generated   Audio Book, human-read   Compilations   Data   Music, recorded   Music, Sheet   Other recordings   Pictures, moving   Pictures, still  

Soldiers of the Commune's National Guard killed two French army generals, and the Commune refused to accept the authority of the French government. The regular French Army suppressed the Commune during " La semaine sanglante " ("The Bloody Week") beginning on 21 May 1871. [7] Debates over the policies and outcome of the Commune had significant influence on the ideas of Karl Marx , who described it as an example of the " dictatorship of the proletariat ". [8]

In 1871 France was deeply divided between the large rural, Catholic and conservative population of the French countryside and the more republican and radical cities of Paris, Marseille, Lyon and a few others. In the first round of the 1869 parliamentary elections held under the French Empire, 4,438,000 had voted for the Bonapartist candidates supporting Napoleon III, while 3,350,000 had voted for the republican opposition. In Paris, however, the republican candidates dominated, winning 234,000 votes against 77,000 for the Bonapartists. [9]

Of the 2 million people in Paris in 1869, according to the official census, there were about 500,000 industrial workers, or fifteen per cent of all the industrial workers in France, plus another 300,000-400,000 workers in other enterprises. Only about 40,000 were employed in factories and large enterprises; most were employed in small industries in textiles, furniture and construction. There were also 115,000 servants and 45,000 concierges. In addition to the native French population, there were about 100,000 immigrant workers and political refugees, the largest number being from Italy and Poland. [9]

During the war and the siege of Paris , various members of the middle- and upper-classes departed the city; at the same time there was an influx of refugees from parts of France occupied by the Germans. The working class and immigrants suffered the most from the lack of industrial activity due to the war and the siege; they formed the bedrock of the Commune's popular support. [9]

The killing of journalist Victor Noir incensed Parisians, and the arrests of journalists critical of the Emperor did nothing to quiet the city. A coup was attempted in early 1870, but tensions eased significantly after the plebiscite in May . The war with Prussia, initiated by Napoleon III in July, was initially met with patriotic fervour. [13]

Paris is the traditional home of French radical movements. Revolutionaries had gone into the streets to oppose their governments during the 1789 French Revolution , the popular uprisings of July 1830 and June 1848 ; all were violently repressed by the government.

Soldiers of the Commune's National Guard killed two French army generals, and the Commune refused to accept the authority of the French government. The regular French Army suppressed the Commune during " La semaine sanglante " ("The Bloody Week") beginning on 21 May 1871. [7] Debates over the policies and outcome of the Commune had significant influence on the ideas of Karl Marx , who described it as an example of the " dictatorship of the proletariat ". [8]

In 1871 France was deeply divided between the large rural, Catholic and conservative population of the French countryside and the more republican and radical cities of Paris, Marseille, Lyon and a few others. In the first round of the 1869 parliamentary elections held under the French Empire, 4,438,000 had voted for the Bonapartist candidates supporting Napoleon III, while 3,350,000 had voted for the republican opposition. In Paris, however, the republican candidates dominated, winning 234,000 votes against 77,000 for the Bonapartists. [9]

Of the 2 million people in Paris in 1869, according to the official census, there were about 500,000 industrial workers, or fifteen per cent of all the industrial workers in France, plus another 300,000-400,000 workers in other enterprises. Only about 40,000 were employed in factories and large enterprises; most were employed in small industries in textiles, furniture and construction. There were also 115,000 servants and 45,000 concierges. In addition to the native French population, there were about 100,000 immigrant workers and political refugees, the largest number being from Italy and Poland. [9]

During the war and the siege of Paris , various members of the middle- and upper-classes departed the city; at the same time there was an influx of refugees from parts of France occupied by the Germans. The working class and immigrants suffered the most from the lack of industrial activity due to the war and the siege; they formed the bedrock of the Commune's popular support. [9]

The killing of journalist Victor Noir incensed Parisians, and the arrests of journalists critical of the Emperor did nothing to quiet the city. A coup was attempted in early 1870, but tensions eased significantly after the plebiscite in May . The war with Prussia, initiated by Napoleon III in July, was initially met with patriotic fervour. [13]

Paris is the traditional home of French radical movements. Revolutionaries had gone into the streets to oppose their governments during the 1789 French Revolution , the popular uprisings of July 1830 and June 1848 ; all were violently repressed by the government.

Issue #2 September 2011  – septembre 2011
160×220 -162 pages – 13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-03-7

Issue #1 January 2011  – janvier 2011
160×220 – 148 pages –  13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-02-0

Co-edited by Blandine Longre and Paul Stubbs, the magazine’s only aim is to publish original world writers, not necessarily linked in any way by ‘theme’ or ‘style’. Writing that we deem can withstand the test of time and might resist popularization – the dangers of instant literature for instant consumption. Writing that seems capable of escaping the vacuum of the epoch. Where the rupture of alternative mindscapes and nationalities exists, so too will The Black Herald .

Soldiers of the Commune's National Guard killed two French army generals, and the Commune refused to accept the authority of the French government. The regular French Army suppressed the Commune during " La semaine sanglante " ("The Bloody Week") beginning on 21 May 1871. [7] Debates over the policies and outcome of the Commune had significant influence on the ideas of Karl Marx , who described it as an example of the " dictatorship of the proletariat ". [8]

In 1871 France was deeply divided between the large rural, Catholic and conservative population of the French countryside and the more republican and radical cities of Paris, Marseille, Lyon and a few others. In the first round of the 1869 parliamentary elections held under the French Empire, 4,438,000 had voted for the Bonapartist candidates supporting Napoleon III, while 3,350,000 had voted for the republican opposition. In Paris, however, the republican candidates dominated, winning 234,000 votes against 77,000 for the Bonapartists. [9]

Of the 2 million people in Paris in 1869, according to the official census, there were about 500,000 industrial workers, or fifteen per cent of all the industrial workers in France, plus another 300,000-400,000 workers in other enterprises. Only about 40,000 were employed in factories and large enterprises; most were employed in small industries in textiles, furniture and construction. There were also 115,000 servants and 45,000 concierges. In addition to the native French population, there were about 100,000 immigrant workers and political refugees, the largest number being from Italy and Poland. [9]

During the war and the siege of Paris , various members of the middle- and upper-classes departed the city; at the same time there was an influx of refugees from parts of France occupied by the Germans. The working class and immigrants suffered the most from the lack of industrial activity due to the war and the siege; they formed the bedrock of the Commune's popular support. [9]

The killing of journalist Victor Noir incensed Parisians, and the arrests of journalists critical of the Emperor did nothing to quiet the city. A coup was attempted in early 1870, but tensions eased significantly after the plebiscite in May . The war with Prussia, initiated by Napoleon III in July, was initially met with patriotic fervour. [13]

Paris is the traditional home of French radical movements. Revolutionaries had gone into the streets to oppose their governments during the 1789 French Revolution , the popular uprisings of July 1830 and June 1848 ; all were violently repressed by the government.

Issue #2 September 2011  – septembre 2011
160×220 -162 pages – 13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-03-7

Issue #1 January 2011  – janvier 2011
160×220 – 148 pages –  13.90 €
ISBN 978-2-919582-02-0

Co-edited by Blandine Longre and Paul Stubbs, the magazine’s only aim is to publish original world writers, not necessarily linked in any way by ‘theme’ or ‘style’. Writing that we deem can withstand the test of time and might resist popularization – the dangers of instant literature for instant consumption. Writing that seems capable of escaping the vacuum of the epoch. Where the rupture of alternative mindscapes and nationalities exists, so too will The Black Herald .

Did you know that you can help us produce ebooks by proof-reading just one page a day? Go to: Distributed Proofreaders

Authors: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   other  

Titles: A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P   Q   R   S   T   U   V   W   X   Y   Z   other  

Languages with more than 50 books: Chinese   Danish   Dutch   English   Esperanto   Finnish   French   German   Greek   Hungarian   Italian   Latin   Portuguese   Spanish   Swedish   Tagalog  

Special Categories: Audio Book, computer-generated   Audio Book, human-read   Compilations   Data   Music, recorded   Music, Sheet   Other recordings   Pictures, moving   Pictures, still  

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