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Grateful Dead ‘drug bust’ at 50: Nothing left to do but.


As the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love comes closer — The Chronicle debuts its commemorative magazine on Sunday, March 12 — events of the year come into a different focus.

It’s clear the mayor and supervisors, who debated placing a “Hippies Not Welcome” sign at the city limits, should have shown more compassion to the young people following the call into San Francisco.

And it’s clear that local authorities — and the media — overreacted on Oct. 2, 1967, when police raided the Grateful Dead’s crash pad at 710 Ashbury St. and hauled 10 handcuffed band members and associates to the police station on questionable marijuana charges.

“The Grateful Dead — ROCK BAND BUSTED,” the San Francisco Chronicle headline read, above the banner on the front page on Oct. 3, 1967, in a giant font generally associated with declarations of war and deaths of presidents.

“The raid — on The Dead’s way-out 13-room pad at 710 Ashbury street — also led to the arrest of the group’s equipment manager, two business managers and six girls, variously described as ‘friends,’ ‘visitors’ and ‘just girls,’” the second paragraph of The Chronicle story began. It was typical of both the article’s sensationalism and awkwardness in trying to appropriate the lingo of the time.

The media was clearly tipped off to the police action. Photographer Barney Peterson took photos inside 710 Ashbury as confusion ensued in the house. Band co-manager Danny Rifkin can be seen in one photo pointing at the camera.

Smile,jpg , also known as Smile.dog, is a creepypasta story about a haunted image that drives those who view it insane. The tale is often accompanied by a photoshopped picture of a sinister-looking Siberian Husky dog.

The exact origin of the Smile.jpg creepypasta is unknown but is rumored to have been first posted on the /x/ (paranormal) board on the imageboard 4chan in 2008. According to the occult-related blog Aether Paranormal, [1] the earliest known image tied to the story is a polaroid-style photograph of a dog with human-like teeth and bloody finger prints (shown below).

The things Mary said made little sense but fit with the pattern I was expecting: though I could not see her, I could tell from her voice that she was crying, and more often than not her objections to speaking with me centered around an incoherent diatribe on her dreams -- her nightmares. Terence apologized profusely when we ceased the exercise, and I did my best to take it in stride; recall that I wasn’t a reporter in search of a story, but merely a curious young man in search of information. Besides, I thought at the time, I could perhaps find another, similar case if I put my mind and resources to it.

Mary E. was the sysop for a small Chicago-based Bulletin Board System in 1992 when she first encountered smile.jpg and her life changed forever. She and Terence had been married for only five months. Mary was one of an estimated 400 people who saw the image when it was posted as a hyperlink on the BBS , though she is the only one who has spoken openly about the experience. The rest have remained anonymous, or are perhaps dead.

In 2005, when I was only in tenth grade, smile.jpg was first brought to my attention by my burgeoning interest in web-based phenomena; Mary was the most often cited victim of what is sometimes referred to as “Smile.dog,” the being smile.jpg is reputed to display. What caught my interest (other than the obvious macabre elements of the cyber-legend and my proclivity toward such things) was the sheer lack of information, usually to the point that people don’t believe it even exists other than as a rumor or hoax.

It is unique because, though the entire phenomenon centers on a picture file, that file is nowhere to be found on the internet; certainly many photomanipulated simulacra litter the web, showing up with the most frequency on sites such as the imageboard 4chan, particularly the /x/-focused paranormal subboard. It is suspected these are fakes because they do not have the effect the true smile.jpg is believed to have, namely sudden onset temporal lobe epilepsy and acute anxiety.

Mary Tyler Moore , who played TV’s first sexy housewife and then a single, career woman who could turn the world on with her smile and toss her hat in the air like no other , died on Wednesday. She was 80.

Her longtime rep issued a statement to PEOPLE: “Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr. S. Robert Levine. A groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile.”

According to a source, Moore had been on a ventilator and had been hospitalized with pneumonia due to complications from her diabetes.  

A Type 1 diabetic, Moore had long suffered a variety of health problems, and in May 2011 underwent elective surgery to remove a benign tumor of the lining tissue of the brain. “I do have problems with my eyes, one eye in particular, and if I fall, I generally break a bone,” she told The New York Times in early 2012 from the Greenwich, Connecticut, home, she shared with Dr. Robert Levine, her husband since 1983, and their four dogs.

Moore was diagnosed with diabetes at 33, and “I thought I’d have to recline on a chaise the rest of my life,” she told PEOPLE in 2009. After that, she said, “there have been challenges, but I’ve triumphed.”

Not only was the beautiful brunette with the big brown eyes and distinctive voice a certifiable TV legend, with two indelible characters to her name — Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show from 1961–66, and Mary Richards on The Mary Tyler Moore Show from 1970–77 — but for the past several years she was a tireless advocate for two causes that also remain part of her legacy: animal rights and juvenile diabetes research.

We're headed back to that peak with the newly returned tapes from Broome County Veterans Memorial Arena, Binghamton, 11/6/77. The Grateful Dead's last touring show of 1977 finds them going for broke, taking chances on fan favorites like "Jack Straw," "Friend Of The Devil," and "The Music Never Stopped," carving out righteous grooves on a one-of-kind "Scarlet> Fire" and a tremendous "Truckin'." An ultra high energy show, with a first set that rivals the second? Not unheard of, but definitely rare. Hear for yourself...

DAVE'S PICKS VOLUME 25 features liner notes by Rob Bleetstein, photos by Bob Minkin, and original art by our 2018 Dave's Picks Artist-In-Residence Tim McDonagh. As always, it has been mastered to HDCD specs by Jeffrey Norman and it is limited to 18,000 individually numbered copies*.

3 Disc set
Limited to 18,000 individually numbered copies
Mastered to HDCD specs by Jeffrey Norman
Digipak made of 100% recycled and PCW materials

Unless Bolo's "clue" is just his way of ribbing everyone for trying to guess the next box set. Which is what I'm inclined to believe, even if I'm ultimately wrong. Because it's much more fun than giving an actual clue. And more devious. Especially considering how many people are probably trying to guess in an enhanced state.

Transfer Info:
Dat (Sony R500) -> SEK’D Prodif Plus -> Samplitude v8.01 Professional -> FLAC
(2 Discs Audio / 1 Disc FLAC)

–Setlist–
101-d1t01 – //Morning Dew
102-d1t02 – Mama Tried
103-d1t03 – Good Lovin’
104-d1t04 – Don’t Ease Me In
105-d1t05 – Cold Rain & Snow
106-d1t06 – High Time
107-d2t01 – Dark//Star ->
108-d2t02 – The Other One ->
109-d2t03 – St. Stephen ->
110-d2t04 – Drums ->
111-d2t05 – Not Fade Away ->
112-d2t06 – Turn on Your Lovelight ->
113-d2t07 – Me & My Uncle

As the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love comes closer — The Chronicle debuts its commemorative magazine on Sunday, March 12 — events of the year come into a different focus.

It’s clear the mayor and supervisors, who debated placing a “Hippies Not Welcome” sign at the city limits, should have shown more compassion to the young people following the call into San Francisco.

And it’s clear that local authorities — and the media — overreacted on Oct. 2, 1967, when police raided the Grateful Dead’s crash pad at 710 Ashbury St. and hauled 10 handcuffed band members and associates to the police station on questionable marijuana charges.

“The Grateful Dead — ROCK BAND BUSTED,” the San Francisco Chronicle headline read, above the banner on the front page on Oct. 3, 1967, in a giant font generally associated with declarations of war and deaths of presidents.

“The raid — on The Dead’s way-out 13-room pad at 710 Ashbury street — also led to the arrest of the group’s equipment manager, two business managers and six girls, variously described as ‘friends,’ ‘visitors’ and ‘just girls,’” the second paragraph of The Chronicle story began. It was typical of both the article’s sensationalism and awkwardness in trying to appropriate the lingo of the time.

The media was clearly tipped off to the police action. Photographer Barney Peterson took photos inside 710 Ashbury as confusion ensued in the house. Band co-manager Danny Rifkin can be seen in one photo pointing at the camera.

Smile,jpg , also known as Smile.dog, is a creepypasta story about a haunted image that drives those who view it insane. The tale is often accompanied by a photoshopped picture of a sinister-looking Siberian Husky dog.

The exact origin of the Smile.jpg creepypasta is unknown but is rumored to have been first posted on the /x/ (paranormal) board on the imageboard 4chan in 2008. According to the occult-related blog Aether Paranormal, [1] the earliest known image tied to the story is a polaroid-style photograph of a dog with human-like teeth and bloody finger prints (shown below).

The things Mary said made little sense but fit with the pattern I was expecting: though I could not see her, I could tell from her voice that she was crying, and more often than not her objections to speaking with me centered around an incoherent diatribe on her dreams -- her nightmares. Terence apologized profusely when we ceased the exercise, and I did my best to take it in stride; recall that I wasn’t a reporter in search of a story, but merely a curious young man in search of information. Besides, I thought at the time, I could perhaps find another, similar case if I put my mind and resources to it.

Mary E. was the sysop for a small Chicago-based Bulletin Board System in 1992 when she first encountered smile.jpg and her life changed forever. She and Terence had been married for only five months. Mary was one of an estimated 400 people who saw the image when it was posted as a hyperlink on the BBS , though she is the only one who has spoken openly about the experience. The rest have remained anonymous, or are perhaps dead.

In 2005, when I was only in tenth grade, smile.jpg was first brought to my attention by my burgeoning interest in web-based phenomena; Mary was the most often cited victim of what is sometimes referred to as “Smile.dog,” the being smile.jpg is reputed to display. What caught my interest (other than the obvious macabre elements of the cyber-legend and my proclivity toward such things) was the sheer lack of information, usually to the point that people don’t believe it even exists other than as a rumor or hoax.

It is unique because, though the entire phenomenon centers on a picture file, that file is nowhere to be found on the internet; certainly many photomanipulated simulacra litter the web, showing up with the most frequency on sites such as the imageboard 4chan, particularly the /x/-focused paranormal subboard. It is suspected these are fakes because they do not have the effect the true smile.jpg is believed to have, namely sudden onset temporal lobe epilepsy and acute anxiety.

Mary Tyler Moore , who played TV’s first sexy housewife and then a single, career woman who could turn the world on with her smile and toss her hat in the air like no other , died on Wednesday. She was 80.

Her longtime rep issued a statement to PEOPLE: “Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr. S. Robert Levine. A groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile.”

According to a source, Moore had been on a ventilator and had been hospitalized with pneumonia due to complications from her diabetes.  

A Type 1 diabetic, Moore had long suffered a variety of health problems, and in May 2011 underwent elective surgery to remove a benign tumor of the lining tissue of the brain. “I do have problems with my eyes, one eye in particular, and if I fall, I generally break a bone,” she told The New York Times in early 2012 from the Greenwich, Connecticut, home, she shared with Dr. Robert Levine, her husband since 1983, and their four dogs.

Moore was diagnosed with diabetes at 33, and “I thought I’d have to recline on a chaise the rest of my life,” she told PEOPLE in 2009. After that, she said, “there have been challenges, but I’ve triumphed.”

Not only was the beautiful brunette with the big brown eyes and distinctive voice a certifiable TV legend, with two indelible characters to her name — Laura Petrie on The Dick Van Dyke Show from 1961–66, and Mary Richards on The Mary Tyler Moore Show from 1970–77 — but for the past several years she was a tireless advocate for two causes that also remain part of her legacy: animal rights and juvenile diabetes research.

As the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love comes closer — The Chronicle debuts its commemorative magazine on Sunday, March 12 — events of the year come into a different focus.

It’s clear the mayor and supervisors, who debated placing a “Hippies Not Welcome” sign at the city limits, should have shown more compassion to the young people following the call into San Francisco.

And it’s clear that local authorities — and the media — overreacted on Oct. 2, 1967, when police raided the Grateful Dead’s crash pad at 710 Ashbury St. and hauled 10 handcuffed band members and associates to the police station on questionable marijuana charges.

“The Grateful Dead — ROCK BAND BUSTED,” the San Francisco Chronicle headline read, above the banner on the front page on Oct. 3, 1967, in a giant font generally associated with declarations of war and deaths of presidents.

“The raid — on The Dead’s way-out 13-room pad at 710 Ashbury street — also led to the arrest of the group’s equipment manager, two business managers and six girls, variously described as ‘friends,’ ‘visitors’ and ‘just girls,’” the second paragraph of The Chronicle story began. It was typical of both the article’s sensationalism and awkwardness in trying to appropriate the lingo of the time.

The media was clearly tipped off to the police action. Photographer Barney Peterson took photos inside 710 Ashbury as confusion ensued in the house. Band co-manager Danny Rifkin can be seen in one photo pointing at the camera.

Smile,jpg , also known as Smile.dog, is a creepypasta story about a haunted image that drives those who view it insane. The tale is often accompanied by a photoshopped picture of a sinister-looking Siberian Husky dog.

The exact origin of the Smile.jpg creepypasta is unknown but is rumored to have been first posted on the /x/ (paranormal) board on the imageboard 4chan in 2008. According to the occult-related blog Aether Paranormal, [1] the earliest known image tied to the story is a polaroid-style photograph of a dog with human-like teeth and bloody finger prints (shown below).

The things Mary said made little sense but fit with the pattern I was expecting: though I could not see her, I could tell from her voice that she was crying, and more often than not her objections to speaking with me centered around an incoherent diatribe on her dreams -- her nightmares. Terence apologized profusely when we ceased the exercise, and I did my best to take it in stride; recall that I wasn’t a reporter in search of a story, but merely a curious young man in search of information. Besides, I thought at the time, I could perhaps find another, similar case if I put my mind and resources to it.

Mary E. was the sysop for a small Chicago-based Bulletin Board System in 1992 when she first encountered smile.jpg and her life changed forever. She and Terence had been married for only five months. Mary was one of an estimated 400 people who saw the image when it was posted as a hyperlink on the BBS , though she is the only one who has spoken openly about the experience. The rest have remained anonymous, or are perhaps dead.

In 2005, when I was only in tenth grade, smile.jpg was first brought to my attention by my burgeoning interest in web-based phenomena; Mary was the most often cited victim of what is sometimes referred to as “Smile.dog,” the being smile.jpg is reputed to display. What caught my interest (other than the obvious macabre elements of the cyber-legend and my proclivity toward such things) was the sheer lack of information, usually to the point that people don’t believe it even exists other than as a rumor or hoax.

It is unique because, though the entire phenomenon centers on a picture file, that file is nowhere to be found on the internet; certainly many photomanipulated simulacra litter the web, showing up with the most frequency on sites such as the imageboard 4chan, particularly the /x/-focused paranormal subboard. It is suspected these are fakes because they do not have the effect the true smile.jpg is believed to have, namely sudden onset temporal lobe epilepsy and acute anxiety.

As the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love comes closer — The Chronicle debuts its commemorative magazine on Sunday, March 12 — events of the year come into a different focus.

It’s clear the mayor and supervisors, who debated placing a “Hippies Not Welcome” sign at the city limits, should have shown more compassion to the young people following the call into San Francisco.

And it’s clear that local authorities — and the media — overreacted on Oct. 2, 1967, when police raided the Grateful Dead’s crash pad at 710 Ashbury St. and hauled 10 handcuffed band members and associates to the police station on questionable marijuana charges.

“The Grateful Dead — ROCK BAND BUSTED,” the San Francisco Chronicle headline read, above the banner on the front page on Oct. 3, 1967, in a giant font generally associated with declarations of war and deaths of presidents.

“The raid — on The Dead’s way-out 13-room pad at 710 Ashbury street — also led to the arrest of the group’s equipment manager, two business managers and six girls, variously described as ‘friends,’ ‘visitors’ and ‘just girls,’” the second paragraph of The Chronicle story began. It was typical of both the article’s sensationalism and awkwardness in trying to appropriate the lingo of the time.

The media was clearly tipped off to the police action. Photographer Barney Peterson took photos inside 710 Ashbury as confusion ensued in the house. Band co-manager Danny Rifkin can be seen in one photo pointing at the camera.


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