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** Dr James N. Adams
All Souls College
james.adams@all-souls.ox.ac.uk
Latin Language and Philology

*  Dr Bill Allan
University College
Tel No: (01865) 276644
william.allan@univ.ox.ac.uk
Archaic and classical Greek literature, especially tragedy and epic

Dr Kalina Allendorf
Corpus Christi College
kalina.allendorf@classics.ox.ac.uk
Latin epic, Latin didactic, esp. Lucretius, Milton, Early Modern classical reception

Mr Tobias Allendorf
Magdalen College
tobias.allendorf@magd.ox.ac.uk
Latin literature, especially Seneca the Younger

Mr Stephen Anderson
New College
stephen.anderson@new.ox.ac.uk
Greek and Latin Language, Epic and Lyric Poetry

*  Dr Rebecca Armstrong
St Hilda's College
Tel No: (01865) 276855
rebecca.armstrong@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk
Latin poetry, especially Vergil, Ovid and Catullus

** Dr James N. Adams
All Souls College
james.adams@all-souls.ox.ac.uk
Latin Language and Philology

*  Dr Bill Allan
University College
Tel No: (01865) 276644
william.allan@univ.ox.ac.uk
Archaic and classical Greek literature, especially tragedy and epic

Dr Kalina Allendorf
Corpus Christi College
kalina.allendorf@classics.ox.ac.uk
Latin epic, Latin didactic, esp. Lucretius, Milton, Early Modern classical reception

Mr Tobias Allendorf
Magdalen College
tobias.allendorf@magd.ox.ac.uk
Latin literature, especially Seneca the Younger

Mr Stephen Anderson
New College
stephen.anderson@new.ox.ac.uk
Greek and Latin Language, Epic and Lyric Poetry

*  Dr Rebecca Armstrong
St Hilda's College
Tel No: (01865) 276855
rebecca.armstrong@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk
Latin poetry, especially Vergil, Ovid and Catullus

Historical institutionalism ( HI ) is a new institutionalist social science method that uses institutions to find sequences of social, political, economic behavior and change across time. It is a comparative approach to the study of all aspects of human organizations and does so by relying heavily on case studies .

Borrowing from Charles Tilly , historical institutionalism is a method apt for measuring "big structures, large processes, and [making] huge comparisons". [1]

Historical institutionalism has generated some of the most important books in the fields of sociology, political science and economics. In fact, some of these studies have inspired policy and its scholars have received numerous awards. Although historical institutionalism proper is fairly new (ca. 1979), it identifies with the great traditions in history, philosophy, politics, sociology and economics.

Institutions have been always central to social science but they have not been addressed with the same emphasis and manner in every approach. Before and after the turn of the twentieth century, several scholars were writing about institutions, but they had not developed a theory of institutions yet. Most of these approaches relied heavily on the study of formal institutions (i.e. the law) (see hermeneutics ). Moreover, they were highly normative and, thus, prescriptive (i.e. Weber prescribed the professionalization of bureaucracy in order to have a modern state). This is often called "old institutionalism". [ citation needed ]

During the 1950s, structural-functionalism blurred the study of institutions. They were more concerned about the variability of the modernization process across countries and about prescribing and generalizing at the systemic level rather than acknowledging the different paths that development can take. (i.e. Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba , The Civic Culture ). [ citation needed ]

The new institutionalism begins with the works of Samuel Huntington , Political Order in Changing Societies ; Barrington Moore 's, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy , and more specifically Theda Skocpol 's, States and Social Revolutions . These books spawned the new research program . [ citation needed ]

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Department of Classics
1115 E. 58th Street Chicago, IL 60637
Division of the Humanities | The University of Chicago

** Dr James N. Adams
All Souls College
james.adams@all-souls.ox.ac.uk
Latin Language and Philology

*  Dr Bill Allan
University College
Tel No: (01865) 276644
william.allan@univ.ox.ac.uk
Archaic and classical Greek literature, especially tragedy and epic

Dr Kalina Allendorf
Corpus Christi College
kalina.allendorf@classics.ox.ac.uk
Latin epic, Latin didactic, esp. Lucretius, Milton, Early Modern classical reception

Mr Tobias Allendorf
Magdalen College
tobias.allendorf@magd.ox.ac.uk
Latin literature, especially Seneca the Younger

Mr Stephen Anderson
New College
stephen.anderson@new.ox.ac.uk
Greek and Latin Language, Epic and Lyric Poetry

*  Dr Rebecca Armstrong
St Hilda's College
Tel No: (01865) 276855
rebecca.armstrong@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk
Latin poetry, especially Vergil, Ovid and Catullus

Historical institutionalism ( HI ) is a new institutionalist social science method that uses institutions to find sequences of social, political, economic behavior and change across time. It is a comparative approach to the study of all aspects of human organizations and does so by relying heavily on case studies .

Borrowing from Charles Tilly , historical institutionalism is a method apt for measuring "big structures, large processes, and [making] huge comparisons". [1]

Historical institutionalism has generated some of the most important books in the fields of sociology, political science and economics. In fact, some of these studies have inspired policy and its scholars have received numerous awards. Although historical institutionalism proper is fairly new (ca. 1979), it identifies with the great traditions in history, philosophy, politics, sociology and economics.

Institutions have been always central to social science but they have not been addressed with the same emphasis and manner in every approach. Before and after the turn of the twentieth century, several scholars were writing about institutions, but they had not developed a theory of institutions yet. Most of these approaches relied heavily on the study of formal institutions (i.e. the law) (see hermeneutics ). Moreover, they were highly normative and, thus, prescriptive (i.e. Weber prescribed the professionalization of bureaucracy in order to have a modern state). This is often called "old institutionalism". [ citation needed ]

During the 1950s, structural-functionalism blurred the study of institutions. They were more concerned about the variability of the modernization process across countries and about prescribing and generalizing at the systemic level rather than acknowledging the different paths that development can take. (i.e. Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba , The Civic Culture ). [ citation needed ]

The new institutionalism begins with the works of Samuel Huntington , Political Order in Changing Societies ; Barrington Moore 's, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy , and more specifically Theda Skocpol 's, States and Social Revolutions . These books spawned the new research program . [ citation needed ]

** Dr James N. Adams
All Souls College
james.adams@all-souls.ox.ac.uk
Latin Language and Philology

*  Dr Bill Allan
University College
Tel No: (01865) 276644
william.allan@univ.ox.ac.uk
Archaic and classical Greek literature, especially tragedy and epic

Dr Kalina Allendorf
Corpus Christi College
kalina.allendorf@classics.ox.ac.uk
Latin epic, Latin didactic, esp. Lucretius, Milton, Early Modern classical reception

Mr Tobias Allendorf
Magdalen College
tobias.allendorf@magd.ox.ac.uk
Latin literature, especially Seneca the Younger

Mr Stephen Anderson
New College
stephen.anderson@new.ox.ac.uk
Greek and Latin Language, Epic and Lyric Poetry

*  Dr Rebecca Armstrong
St Hilda's College
Tel No: (01865) 276855
rebecca.armstrong@st-hildas.ox.ac.uk
Latin poetry, especially Vergil, Ovid and Catullus

Historical institutionalism ( HI ) is a new institutionalist social science method that uses institutions to find sequences of social, political, economic behavior and change across time. It is a comparative approach to the study of all aspects of human organizations and does so by relying heavily on case studies .

Borrowing from Charles Tilly , historical institutionalism is a method apt for measuring "big structures, large processes, and [making] huge comparisons". [1]

Historical institutionalism has generated some of the most important books in the fields of sociology, political science and economics. In fact, some of these studies have inspired policy and its scholars have received numerous awards. Although historical institutionalism proper is fairly new (ca. 1979), it identifies with the great traditions in history, philosophy, politics, sociology and economics.

Institutions have been always central to social science but they have not been addressed with the same emphasis and manner in every approach. Before and after the turn of the twentieth century, several scholars were writing about institutions, but they had not developed a theory of institutions yet. Most of these approaches relied heavily on the study of formal institutions (i.e. the law) (see hermeneutics ). Moreover, they were highly normative and, thus, prescriptive (i.e. Weber prescribed the professionalization of bureaucracy in order to have a modern state). This is often called "old institutionalism". [ citation needed ]

During the 1950s, structural-functionalism blurred the study of institutions. They were more concerned about the variability of the modernization process across countries and about prescribing and generalizing at the systemic level rather than acknowledging the different paths that development can take. (i.e. Gabriel Almond and Sidney Verba , The Civic Culture ). [ citation needed ]

The new institutionalism begins with the works of Samuel Huntington , Political Order in Changing Societies ; Barrington Moore 's, Social Origins of Dictatorship and Democracy , and more specifically Theda Skocpol 's, States and Social Revolutions . These books spawned the new research program . [ citation needed ]

Please choose whether or not you want other users to be able to see on your profile that this library is a favorite of yours.


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