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Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies | Harvard-Yenching.


The bananas and seahorses that adorn the cover are two of the dozens of colorful illustrations in Chūzan bussankō 中山物産考 (ca. 1769), a description of the geography, flora, and fauna of the Ryukyu Kingdom (modern Okinawa) in the Harvard- Yenching Library’s rare book collection. The author, Tamura Ransui 田村藍水 (1718–1776), was an Edo-born doctor and naturalist who rose to prominence as a key figure in the Tokugawa shogunate’s successful effort to produce ginseng domestically from seeds smuggled from Korea. He wrote extensively on ginseng and other plants with economic value, such as sweet potatoes and cotton.

Zhao Xuemin 趙學敏, the subject of He Bian’s article in this issue, knew and wrote about many of the plants and animals featured in Chūzan bussankō . There is no reason to believe he was familiar with the work. Rather, both he and Ransui were participants in a lively transnational, even global, discourse on natural history that attracted scholars and policymakers interested in materia medica and other useful products.

¹Jo Hokō (Xu Baoguang), Chūzan denshinroku ( Zhongshan chuanxin lu ), punctuated by Hattori Somon 服部蘇門, 6 kan 卷 (Kyoto: Ran’en, n.d.); Antoine Gaubil, “Mémoire sur les isles que les Chinois appellent isles de Lieou-Kieou” (1758), in Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, écrites des missions étrangeres: Mémoires de la Chine, &c. , vol. 23 (Paris: J. G. Merigot, 1781), pp. 182–245.

Tamura Ransui, Chūzan bussankō , 3 vols. ( kan ) [ca. 1769], vol. 2 (seq. 29, seq. 44); MS no. TJ 3468/6441, Rare Book Collection, Harvard-Yenching Library, Harvard University, Cambridge MA , http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3: FHCL :32692219 . Photo: Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

本文以乾隆『御製增訂清文鑑』為例,探討清朝構造的以滿文為中心的多語言制度及其在朝鮮和日本的傳播和轉變。日本和朝鮮學者利用滿語辭書所載的漢語白話譯文與官話注音來學習漢語。漢語對學習滿文必不可少,於是日朝學者往往把辭書中的漢語白話部分作為研究的對象。

ナチス·ドイツによるユダヤ人虐殺の犯罪責任を再考察した「イエルサレムのアイヒマン」著者のハンナ·アーレント氏ならば、南京虐殺及び原爆投下をいかに裁いたであろう?東京裁判の記録や堀田善衛の小説「審判」にアーレント思想を適用し、その法律的、倫理的な諸問題を解いてみる。

The bananas and seahorses that adorn the cover are two of the dozens of colorful illustrations in Chūzan bussankō 中山物産考 (ca. 1769), a description of the geography, flora, and fauna of the Ryukyu Kingdom (modern Okinawa) in the Harvard- Yenching Library’s rare book collection. The author, Tamura Ransui 田村藍水 (1718–1776), was an Edo-born doctor and naturalist who rose to prominence as a key figure in the Tokugawa shogunate’s successful effort to produce ginseng domestically from seeds smuggled from Korea. He wrote extensively on ginseng and other plants with economic value, such as sweet potatoes and cotton.

Zhao Xuemin 趙學敏, the subject of He Bian’s article in this issue, knew and wrote about many of the plants and animals featured in Chūzan bussankō . There is no reason to believe he was familiar with the work. Rather, both he and Ransui were participants in a lively transnational, even global, discourse on natural history that attracted scholars and policymakers interested in materia medica and other useful products.

¹Jo Hokō (Xu Baoguang), Chūzan denshinroku ( Zhongshan chuanxin lu ), punctuated by Hattori Somon 服部蘇門, 6 kan 卷 (Kyoto: Ran’en, n.d.); Antoine Gaubil, “Mémoire sur les isles que les Chinois appellent isles de Lieou-Kieou” (1758), in Lettres édifiantes et curieuses, écrites des missions étrangeres: Mémoires de la Chine, &c. , vol. 23 (Paris: J. G. Merigot, 1781), pp. 182–245.

Tamura Ransui, Chūzan bussankō , 3 vols. ( kan ) [ca. 1769], vol. 2 (seq. 29, seq. 44); MS no. TJ 3468/6441, Rare Book Collection, Harvard-Yenching Library, Harvard University, Cambridge MA , http://nrs.harvard.edu/urn-3: FHCL :32692219 . Photo: Imaging Department © President and Fellows of Harvard College.

本文以乾隆『御製增訂清文鑑』為例,探討清朝構造的以滿文為中心的多語言制度及其在朝鮮和日本的傳播和轉變。日本和朝鮮學者利用滿語辭書所載的漢語白話譯文與官話注音來學習漢語。漢語對學習滿文必不可少,於是日朝學者往往把辭書中的漢語白話部分作為研究的對象。

ナチス·ドイツによるユダヤ人虐殺の犯罪責任を再考察した「イエルサレムのアイヒマン」著者のハンナ·アーレント氏ならば、南京虐殺及び原爆投下をいかに裁いたであろう?東京裁判の記録や堀田善衛の小説「審判」にアーレント思想を適用し、その法律的、倫理的な諸問題を解いてみる。

The Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies (HJAS) is an English-language scholarly journal published by the Harvard-Yenching Institute . HJAS features articles and book reviews of current scholarship in East Asian Studies , focusing on Chinese , Japanese , and Korean history , literature and religion , with occasional coverage of politics and linguistics .

Serge Elisséeff founded the Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies in 1936 under the auspices of the Harvard-Yenching Institute , an independent, non-profit organization founded in 1928 to further the spread of knowledge and scholarship on East and Southeast Asia . Elisséeff's wide range of knowledge came to be reflected in the diverse character of the journal during the twenty-one years he served as its editor (1936-1957). [1]

The journal was published three times yearly from its inception until 1947. From 1948 until 1957 it was released biannually, but from 1958 to 1976 the journal was released only annually or in two-year periods. Since 1977 it has been published twice yearly in June and December.

The Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies , with Monumenta Nipponica , is one of the largest and most influential American journals on East Asian scholarship. The journal focuses on analytical articles and does not print translations, unlike Monumenta Nipponica .


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