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Omar Sharif - IMDb


The Sharif Bridge Circus was a touring professional team of world class players, organized and headed by movie star Omar Sharif, to play a series of exhibition matches against leading European and North American teams.

The Circus made its debut late in 1967 when Sharif, Giorgio Belladonna, Claude Delmouly, Benito Garozzo, and Leon Yallouze, all playing the Blue Team Club, defeated the Dutch international team in matches sponsored by newspapers and played in three Netherlands cities before enthusiastic audiences who viewed the competition on Bridge-o-Rama.

Using this format – a match against a highly rated team with the play-by-play displayed to the audience accompanied by expert commentary – the Circus made an extended tour in 1968. It defeated teams in Italy and London, lost its first matches to The Netherlands and Belgium in The Hague, and made a swing through six North American cities: Montreal, Toronto, Los Angeles, Dallas, New Orleans and New York – winning the majority of the matches. Several of the American matches were three-cornered contests involving the Circus, the local team and the Aces.

A second tour in 1970 received a spectacular sendoff when Jeremy Flint and Jonathan Cansino challenged Sharif and company to a 100-rubber pairs game in London (later reduced by time pressure to 80 rubbers). The stakes were an unprecedented British pound ($2.40) per point, plus an additional bonus of $1000 on the net result of each four rubbers.

The match attracted wide newspaper and magazine coverage in the United States as well as in Europe. Sharif won by a margin of 5,470 points and collected more than $18,000. However, this was a comparatively small sum against the expenses of staging the match and taping the highlights for a series of television shows planned for later syndication. The TV shows never aired.

This was immediately followed by a tour of seven North American cities – Chicago, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Dallas, Detroit and Philadelphia. In addition to matches against powerful teams of local stars, the tour included a marathon 840-deal match against the Aces, who accompanied the Circus throughout the tour. The Circus defeated the all-star teams in Chicago, Winnipeg and St. Paul, but lost all its other matches, bowing to the Aces by 101 IMPs (1793-1692) after the lead had seesawed excitingly from city to city. Pietro Forquet joined the Sharif team in Dallas but could not reverse the effect of the exhausting schedule, which included numerous personal appearances by Sharif.

The Sharif Bridge Circus was a touring professional team of world class players, organized and headed by movie star Omar Sharif, to play a series of exhibition matches against leading European and North American teams.

The Circus made its debut late in 1967 when Sharif, Giorgio Belladonna, Claude Delmouly, Benito Garozzo, and Leon Yallouze, all playing the Blue Team Club, defeated the Dutch international team in matches sponsored by newspapers and played in three Netherlands cities before enthusiastic audiences who viewed the competition on Bridge-o-Rama.

Using this format – a match against a highly rated team with the play-by-play displayed to the audience accompanied by expert commentary – the Circus made an extended tour in 1968. It defeated teams in Italy and London, lost its first matches to The Netherlands and Belgium in The Hague, and made a swing through six North American cities: Montreal, Toronto, Los Angeles, Dallas, New Orleans and New York – winning the majority of the matches. Several of the American matches were three-cornered contests involving the Circus, the local team and the Aces.

A second tour in 1970 received a spectacular sendoff when Jeremy Flint and Jonathan Cansino challenged Sharif and company to a 100-rubber pairs game in London (later reduced by time pressure to 80 rubbers). The stakes were an unprecedented British pound ($2.40) per point, plus an additional bonus of $1000 on the net result of each four rubbers.

The match attracted wide newspaper and magazine coverage in the United States as well as in Europe. Sharif won by a margin of 5,470 points and collected more than $18,000. However, this was a comparatively small sum against the expenses of staging the match and taping the highlights for a series of television shows planned for later syndication. The TV shows never aired.

This was immediately followed by a tour of seven North American cities – Chicago, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Dallas, Detroit and Philadelphia. In addition to matches against powerful teams of local stars, the tour included a marathon 840-deal match against the Aces, who accompanied the Circus throughout the tour. The Circus defeated the all-star teams in Chicago, Winnipeg and St. Paul, but lost all its other matches, bowing to the Aces by 101 IMPs (1793-1692) after the lead had seesawed excitingly from city to city. Pietro Forquet joined the Sharif team in Dallas but could not reverse the effect of the exhausting schedule, which included numerous personal appearances by Sharif.

By now we've all heard about the incident , involving Omar Sharif and a pushy Egyptian journo. Even though I was a few feet away, no I did not witness it personally, the video is unclear and so I'll reserve my opinion. But what I can say is that I spent a good 30 minutes with Omar Sharif right before it all allegedly happened and he behaved like ever the gentleman in my presence. Now, about answering questions he doesn't approve of or finds mundane, that's a different story... Sharif is wonderfully evasive and refuses to say anything that can be used as a slogan for institutions or to promote an organization.

Yet don't be quick to chuck up the actions of this mega star from the Arab world to his age and health. In front of me, in the Press Lounge at the Doha Tribeca Film Festival , stood an Omar Sharif whose face may show a few extra lines, whose voice may seem a bit softer but whose mind is as sharp as it ever was, if not rendered sharper by time and experience. His secret? "I exercise, now that I'm older, I run three thousand steps every day, I count them while I'm running, it occupies my brain. Even before I came here I did my 3,000." An avid ex smoker, Sharif had triple bypass surgery, then after suffering a heart attack in 1994 quit the habit altogether.

Dressed in a black polo and black trousers, Sharif admitted to living out of a suitcase at this time in his life, albeit "a nice suitcase, very strong" he said smiling, tongue in cheek. Asked what he did with his Golden Globes, he casually dismissed the question with an "I don't have them anymore... I had so many prizes, French César, Leone d'Oro from Venezia... I can't travel with these things, so I left them in the hotels with housekeeping."

When asked about the movements of the Arab Spring, he facetiously leaned forward and asked right back "what is the Arab Spring? I don't know what it is this 'Arab Spring.' Spring is such a beautiful term, we are improving at democracy." Then added "I hope the army will not interfere, that they stay the army, to protect the country but not enter into politics" a statement obviously directed at his own home country of Egypt.

It was then that I thought it the right moment to bring up the statement made by Marlon Brando before his death, which I heard in Ridha Behi's latest oeuvre Always Brando .

"Mr. Sharif, Brando once said you are the only superstar to come out of the Arab world and that there could never be another Omar Sharif in today's world. What do you think of that?"

Omar Sharif idly noticed a bridge book lying around on a movie set. After reading it, he became fascinated by rubber and duplicate bridge .

Omar Sharif , Actor: Lawrence of Arabia. Omar Sharif , the Egyptian actor best known for playing Sherif Ali in Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and the title role in Doctor ...

Omar Sharif : Omar Sharif , Egyptian actor of international acclaim, known for his dashing good looks and roles in such films as Doctor Zhivago.

21.06.2016  · Omar Sharif Bridge 3D uses beautiful 3D graphics and advanced computer intelligence to make you a better bridge player! The objective of this original ...

Over the years LagOmar has been visited by the artists Alberto Vasquez Figueroa, the gypsy dancers of Antonio Canales, the singer Montse Cortés and the festival of ...

12.07.2015  · Legendary actor Omar Sharif , who died on Friday after suffering a heart attack aged 83, has been laid to rest in his native Egypt at a solemn funeral in a ...

The Sharif Bridge Circus was a touring professional team of world class players, organized and headed by movie star Omar Sharif, to play a series of exhibition matches against leading European and North American teams.

The Circus made its debut late in 1967 when Sharif, Giorgio Belladonna, Claude Delmouly, Benito Garozzo, and Leon Yallouze, all playing the Blue Team Club, defeated the Dutch international team in matches sponsored by newspapers and played in three Netherlands cities before enthusiastic audiences who viewed the competition on Bridge-o-Rama.

Using this format – a match against a highly rated team with the play-by-play displayed to the audience accompanied by expert commentary – the Circus made an extended tour in 1968. It defeated teams in Italy and London, lost its first matches to The Netherlands and Belgium in The Hague, and made a swing through six North American cities: Montreal, Toronto, Los Angeles, Dallas, New Orleans and New York – winning the majority of the matches. Several of the American matches were three-cornered contests involving the Circus, the local team and the Aces.

A second tour in 1970 received a spectacular sendoff when Jeremy Flint and Jonathan Cansino challenged Sharif and company to a 100-rubber pairs game in London (later reduced by time pressure to 80 rubbers). The stakes were an unprecedented British pound ($2.40) per point, plus an additional bonus of $1000 on the net result of each four rubbers.

The match attracted wide newspaper and magazine coverage in the United States as well as in Europe. Sharif won by a margin of 5,470 points and collected more than $18,000. However, this was a comparatively small sum against the expenses of staging the match and taping the highlights for a series of television shows planned for later syndication. The TV shows never aired.

This was immediately followed by a tour of seven North American cities – Chicago, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Dallas, Detroit and Philadelphia. In addition to matches against powerful teams of local stars, the tour included a marathon 840-deal match against the Aces, who accompanied the Circus throughout the tour. The Circus defeated the all-star teams in Chicago, Winnipeg and St. Paul, but lost all its other matches, bowing to the Aces by 101 IMPs (1793-1692) after the lead had seesawed excitingly from city to city. Pietro Forquet joined the Sharif team in Dallas but could not reverse the effect of the exhausting schedule, which included numerous personal appearances by Sharif.

By now we've all heard about the incident , involving Omar Sharif and a pushy Egyptian journo. Even though I was a few feet away, no I did not witness it personally, the video is unclear and so I'll reserve my opinion. But what I can say is that I spent a good 30 minutes with Omar Sharif right before it all allegedly happened and he behaved like ever the gentleman in my presence. Now, about answering questions he doesn't approve of or finds mundane, that's a different story... Sharif is wonderfully evasive and refuses to say anything that can be used as a slogan for institutions or to promote an organization.

Yet don't be quick to chuck up the actions of this mega star from the Arab world to his age and health. In front of me, in the Press Lounge at the Doha Tribeca Film Festival , stood an Omar Sharif whose face may show a few extra lines, whose voice may seem a bit softer but whose mind is as sharp as it ever was, if not rendered sharper by time and experience. His secret? "I exercise, now that I'm older, I run three thousand steps every day, I count them while I'm running, it occupies my brain. Even before I came here I did my 3,000." An avid ex smoker, Sharif had triple bypass surgery, then after suffering a heart attack in 1994 quit the habit altogether.

Dressed in a black polo and black trousers, Sharif admitted to living out of a suitcase at this time in his life, albeit "a nice suitcase, very strong" he said smiling, tongue in cheek. Asked what he did with his Golden Globes, he casually dismissed the question with an "I don't have them anymore... I had so many prizes, French César, Leone d'Oro from Venezia... I can't travel with these things, so I left them in the hotels with housekeeping."

When asked about the movements of the Arab Spring, he facetiously leaned forward and asked right back "what is the Arab Spring? I don't know what it is this 'Arab Spring.' Spring is such a beautiful term, we are improving at democracy." Then added "I hope the army will not interfere, that they stay the army, to protect the country but not enter into politics" a statement obviously directed at his own home country of Egypt.

It was then that I thought it the right moment to bring up the statement made by Marlon Brando before his death, which I heard in Ridha Behi's latest oeuvre Always Brando .

"Mr. Sharif, Brando once said you are the only superstar to come out of the Arab world and that there could never be another Omar Sharif in today's world. What do you think of that?"

Omar Sharif idly noticed a bridge book lying around on a movie set. After reading it, he became fascinated by rubber and duplicate bridge .

Omar Sharif , Actor: Lawrence of Arabia. Omar Sharif , the Egyptian actor best known for playing Sherif Ali in Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and the title role in Doctor ...

Omar Sharif : Omar Sharif , Egyptian actor of international acclaim, known for his dashing good looks and roles in such films as Doctor Zhivago.

21.06.2016  · Omar Sharif Bridge 3D uses beautiful 3D graphics and advanced computer intelligence to make you a better bridge player! The objective of this original ...

Over the years LagOmar has been visited by the artists Alberto Vasquez Figueroa, the gypsy dancers of Antonio Canales, the singer Montse Cortés and the festival of ...

12.07.2015  · Legendary actor Omar Sharif , who died on Friday after suffering a heart attack aged 83, has been laid to rest in his native Egypt at a solemn funeral in a ...

3.9k shares 250

The Sharif Bridge Circus was a touring professional team of world class players, organized and headed by movie star Omar Sharif, to play a series of exhibition matches against leading European and North American teams.

The Circus made its debut late in 1967 when Sharif, Giorgio Belladonna, Claude Delmouly, Benito Garozzo, and Leon Yallouze, all playing the Blue Team Club, defeated the Dutch international team in matches sponsored by newspapers and played in three Netherlands cities before enthusiastic audiences who viewed the competition on Bridge-o-Rama.

Using this format – a match against a highly rated team with the play-by-play displayed to the audience accompanied by expert commentary – the Circus made an extended tour in 1968. It defeated teams in Italy and London, lost its first matches to The Netherlands and Belgium in The Hague, and made a swing through six North American cities: Montreal, Toronto, Los Angeles, Dallas, New Orleans and New York – winning the majority of the matches. Several of the American matches were three-cornered contests involving the Circus, the local team and the Aces.

A second tour in 1970 received a spectacular sendoff when Jeremy Flint and Jonathan Cansino challenged Sharif and company to a 100-rubber pairs game in London (later reduced by time pressure to 80 rubbers). The stakes were an unprecedented British pound ($2.40) per point, plus an additional bonus of $1000 on the net result of each four rubbers.

The match attracted wide newspaper and magazine coverage in the United States as well as in Europe. Sharif won by a margin of 5,470 points and collected more than $18,000. However, this was a comparatively small sum against the expenses of staging the match and taping the highlights for a series of television shows planned for later syndication. The TV shows never aired.

This was immediately followed by a tour of seven North American cities – Chicago, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Dallas, Detroit and Philadelphia. In addition to matches against powerful teams of local stars, the tour included a marathon 840-deal match against the Aces, who accompanied the Circus throughout the tour. The Circus defeated the all-star teams in Chicago, Winnipeg and St. Paul, but lost all its other matches, bowing to the Aces by 101 IMPs (1793-1692) after the lead had seesawed excitingly from city to city. Pietro Forquet joined the Sharif team in Dallas but could not reverse the effect of the exhausting schedule, which included numerous personal appearances by Sharif.

By now we've all heard about the incident , involving Omar Sharif and a pushy Egyptian journo. Even though I was a few feet away, no I did not witness it personally, the video is unclear and so I'll reserve my opinion. But what I can say is that I spent a good 30 minutes with Omar Sharif right before it all allegedly happened and he behaved like ever the gentleman in my presence. Now, about answering questions he doesn't approve of or finds mundane, that's a different story... Sharif is wonderfully evasive and refuses to say anything that can be used as a slogan for institutions or to promote an organization.

Yet don't be quick to chuck up the actions of this mega star from the Arab world to his age and health. In front of me, in the Press Lounge at the Doha Tribeca Film Festival , stood an Omar Sharif whose face may show a few extra lines, whose voice may seem a bit softer but whose mind is as sharp as it ever was, if not rendered sharper by time and experience. His secret? "I exercise, now that I'm older, I run three thousand steps every day, I count them while I'm running, it occupies my brain. Even before I came here I did my 3,000." An avid ex smoker, Sharif had triple bypass surgery, then after suffering a heart attack in 1994 quit the habit altogether.

Dressed in a black polo and black trousers, Sharif admitted to living out of a suitcase at this time in his life, albeit "a nice suitcase, very strong" he said smiling, tongue in cheek. Asked what he did with his Golden Globes, he casually dismissed the question with an "I don't have them anymore... I had so many prizes, French César, Leone d'Oro from Venezia... I can't travel with these things, so I left them in the hotels with housekeeping."

When asked about the movements of the Arab Spring, he facetiously leaned forward and asked right back "what is the Arab Spring? I don't know what it is this 'Arab Spring.' Spring is such a beautiful term, we are improving at democracy." Then added "I hope the army will not interfere, that they stay the army, to protect the country but not enter into politics" a statement obviously directed at his own home country of Egypt.

It was then that I thought it the right moment to bring up the statement made by Marlon Brando before his death, which I heard in Ridha Behi's latest oeuvre Always Brando .

"Mr. Sharif, Brando once said you are the only superstar to come out of the Arab world and that there could never be another Omar Sharif in today's world. What do you think of that?"

Omar Sharif idly noticed a bridge book lying around on a movie set. After reading it, he became fascinated by rubber and duplicate bridge .

Omar Sharif , Actor: Lawrence of Arabia. Omar Sharif , the Egyptian actor best known for playing Sherif Ali in Lawrence of Arabia (1962) and the title role in Doctor ...

Omar Sharif : Omar Sharif , Egyptian actor of international acclaim, known for his dashing good looks and roles in such films as Doctor Zhivago.

21.06.2016  · Omar Sharif Bridge 3D uses beautiful 3D graphics and advanced computer intelligence to make you a better bridge player! The objective of this original ...

Over the years LagOmar has been visited by the artists Alberto Vasquez Figueroa, the gypsy dancers of Antonio Canales, the singer Montse Cortés and the festival of ...

12.07.2015  · Legendary actor Omar Sharif , who died on Friday after suffering a heart attack aged 83, has been laid to rest in his native Egypt at a solemn funeral in a ...

3.9k shares 250

In the early 1970s actor Omar Sharif came to Lanzarote to film “The Mysterious Island”, he visited LagOmar, fell in love with it and bought it.

San Benady knowing Sharif’s reputation as a card player challenged him to a game of Bridge. Sharif accepted the challenge, not realizing that Benady was also a champion Bridge player, and allegedly lost the house.

In 1989 architects Dominik von Boettinger from Germany and Beatriz van Hoff from Uruguay bought the house and initiated the last phase of development. They sought the advice of local artists and created a vernacular architecture inspired by the elements and the island’s capricious topography.

The gallery hosts itinerant exhibitions and sponsor emerging talents on the island. lagomar
Museum Every Day
10:00 – 18:00
Adults
6€
Children
2€
Residents other Canary Islands
4€
Residents Lanzarote
2€

The Sharif Bridge Circus was a touring professional team of world class players, organized and headed by movie star Omar Sharif, to play a series of exhibition matches against leading European and North American teams.

The Circus made its debut late in 1967 when Sharif, Giorgio Belladonna, Claude Delmouly, Benito Garozzo, and Leon Yallouze, all playing the Blue Team Club, defeated the Dutch international team in matches sponsored by newspapers and played in three Netherlands cities before enthusiastic audiences who viewed the competition on Bridge-o-Rama.

Using this format – a match against a highly rated team with the play-by-play displayed to the audience accompanied by expert commentary – the Circus made an extended tour in 1968. It defeated teams in Italy and London, lost its first matches to The Netherlands and Belgium in The Hague, and made a swing through six North American cities: Montreal, Toronto, Los Angeles, Dallas, New Orleans and New York – winning the majority of the matches. Several of the American matches were three-cornered contests involving the Circus, the local team and the Aces.

A second tour in 1970 received a spectacular sendoff when Jeremy Flint and Jonathan Cansino challenged Sharif and company to a 100-rubber pairs game in London (later reduced by time pressure to 80 rubbers). The stakes were an unprecedented British pound ($2.40) per point, plus an additional bonus of $1000 on the net result of each four rubbers.

The match attracted wide newspaper and magazine coverage in the United States as well as in Europe. Sharif won by a margin of 5,470 points and collected more than $18,000. However, this was a comparatively small sum against the expenses of staging the match and taping the highlights for a series of television shows planned for later syndication. The TV shows never aired.

This was immediately followed by a tour of seven North American cities – Chicago, Winnipeg, Los Angeles, St. Paul, Dallas, Detroit and Philadelphia. In addition to matches against powerful teams of local stars, the tour included a marathon 840-deal match against the Aces, who accompanied the Circus throughout the tour. The Circus defeated the all-star teams in Chicago, Winnipeg and St. Paul, but lost all its other matches, bowing to the Aces by 101 IMPs (1793-1692) after the lead had seesawed excitingly from city to city. Pietro Forquet joined the Sharif team in Dallas but could not reverse the effect of the exhausting schedule, which included numerous personal appearances by Sharif.

By now we've all heard about the incident , involving Omar Sharif and a pushy Egyptian journo. Even though I was a few feet away, no I did not witness it personally, the video is unclear and so I'll reserve my opinion. But what I can say is that I spent a good 30 minutes with Omar Sharif right before it all allegedly happened and he behaved like ever the gentleman in my presence. Now, about answering questions he doesn't approve of or finds mundane, that's a different story... Sharif is wonderfully evasive and refuses to say anything that can be used as a slogan for institutions or to promote an organization.

Yet don't be quick to chuck up the actions of this mega star from the Arab world to his age and health. In front of me, in the Press Lounge at the Doha Tribeca Film Festival , stood an Omar Sharif whose face may show a few extra lines, whose voice may seem a bit softer but whose mind is as sharp as it ever was, if not rendered sharper by time and experience. His secret? "I exercise, now that I'm older, I run three thousand steps every day, I count them while I'm running, it occupies my brain. Even before I came here I did my 3,000." An avid ex smoker, Sharif had triple bypass surgery, then after suffering a heart attack in 1994 quit the habit altogether.

Dressed in a black polo and black trousers, Sharif admitted to living out of a suitcase at this time in his life, albeit "a nice suitcase, very strong" he said smiling, tongue in cheek. Asked what he did with his Golden Globes, he casually dismissed the question with an "I don't have them anymore... I had so many prizes, French César, Leone d'Oro from Venezia... I can't travel with these things, so I left them in the hotels with housekeeping."

When asked about the movements of the Arab Spring, he facetiously leaned forward and asked right back "what is the Arab Spring? I don't know what it is this 'Arab Spring.' Spring is such a beautiful term, we are improving at democracy." Then added "I hope the army will not interfere, that they stay the army, to protect the country but not enter into politics" a statement obviously directed at his own home country of Egypt.

It was then that I thought it the right moment to bring up the statement made by Marlon Brando before his death, which I heard in Ridha Behi's latest oeuvre Always Brando .

"Mr. Sharif, Brando once said you are the only superstar to come out of the Arab world and that there could never be another Omar Sharif in today's world. What do you think of that?"


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