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Everyone knows that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and that applies to art and literature, too, especially if we consider the ever-growing array of modern novels that draw from some of lit’s most classic titles to frame up brand-new tales. Using beloved novels as a jumping-off point for new stories – whether they are faithful continuations, monstrous tales that somehow manage to inject all kinds of ghoulies into classic tales, or entirely fresh spins on enduring material – is a great way to spice up a stale reading list and provide some real richness to fresh stories. Here are eleven good ones to get you started.

A modern spin on Oscar Wilde’s creepy The Picture of Dorian Gray , Self’s 2002 novel moves the action to the '80s and '90s, even though it still keeps the heart of Wilde’s story very much intact. His Dorian is still called Dorian Gray, but Self moves his own (very modern) man into the looks-obsessed art scene of London, with Dorian trying to make his way in the modeling arm (a buff, chiseled arm, to be sure) of the creative crowd. He tries not to be “looks obsessed,” but he fails pretty spectacularly.

Plenty of novels about manners (and, yes, also romance) have been adapted into modern tales about love lives in disarray, and it’s quite easy to find new takes on Jane Austen’s or the Bronte sisters’ books at your local bookstore, but Wyler’s is one of the best. A slightly less dark spin on Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights , Wyler’s book sees an American woman decamped to the moors of England to settle up an estate (such glamour!) who is subsequently pulled between two very different men (OK, that’s kind of glamorous). If you love Wuthering Heights  but aren’t in the mood to have your heart broken repeatedly by a book, Solsbury Hill  is the ticket.

Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote  is wild and woolly on its own, but Bray’s 2009 retelling of the story is positively bonkers. The black comedy centers on high school student Cameron Smith, a regular enough dude who soon comes down with Mad Cow Disease. Cam’s journey through his illness is packed with hallucinations, stream of consciousness weirdness, and tons of symbolism, and it’s probably the best way to get other high schoolers interested in de Cervantes’ enduring classic.

Like Benincasa’s Great , Segal’s debut novel transplants the action of a classic work (in this case, Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence ) into a modern setting with relative ease and some big returns. In The Innocents , we encounter an engaged pair (Adam and Rachel) that is about to embark on a wedding (and marriage) that is desired and encouraged by many. Wait, not so fast! Enter Ellie, Rachel’s wild cousin (and maybe something more to Adam?) and watch the sparks fly (and the hearts break).

The Peter Pan  storyline has been mined for modern works numerous times—from a YA novel that focuses on the romance between Tiger Lily and Peter to an entire series about how Mr. Pan becomes the character we know and love—but the most assuredly contemporary of all the stories is Sheinmel’s Second Star . Sheinmel’s thoroughly modern take on the J.M. Barrie classic imagines that the Darling boys are renegade teen surfers who purposely run away to join up with a hip surf gang. Wendy, of course, goes after them, only to find herself pulled into the club, too, thanks to the intriguing nature of their leader, Pete.

Everyone knows that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, and that applies to art and literature, too, especially if we consider the ever-growing array of modern novels that draw from some of lit’s most classic titles to frame up brand-new tales. Using beloved novels as a jumping-off point for new stories – whether they are faithful continuations, monstrous tales that somehow manage to inject all kinds of ghoulies into classic tales, or entirely fresh spins on enduring material – is a great way to spice up a stale reading list and provide some real richness to fresh stories. Here are eleven good ones to get you started.

A modern spin on Oscar Wilde’s creepy The Picture of Dorian Gray , Self’s 2002 novel moves the action to the '80s and '90s, even though it still keeps the heart of Wilde’s story very much intact. His Dorian is still called Dorian Gray, but Self moves his own (very modern) man into the looks-obsessed art scene of London, with Dorian trying to make his way in the modeling arm (a buff, chiseled arm, to be sure) of the creative crowd. He tries not to be “looks obsessed,” but he fails pretty spectacularly.

Plenty of novels about manners (and, yes, also romance) have been adapted into modern tales about love lives in disarray, and it’s quite easy to find new takes on Jane Austen’s or the Bronte sisters’ books at your local bookstore, but Wyler’s is one of the best. A slightly less dark spin on Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights , Wyler’s book sees an American woman decamped to the moors of England to settle up an estate (such glamour!) who is subsequently pulled between two very different men (OK, that’s kind of glamorous). If you love Wuthering Heights  but aren’t in the mood to have your heart broken repeatedly by a book, Solsbury Hill  is the ticket.

Miguel de Cervantes’ Don Quixote  is wild and woolly on its own, but Bray’s 2009 retelling of the story is positively bonkers. The black comedy centers on high school student Cameron Smith, a regular enough dude who soon comes down with Mad Cow Disease. Cam’s journey through his illness is packed with hallucinations, stream of consciousness weirdness, and tons of symbolism, and it’s probably the best way to get other high schoolers interested in de Cervantes’ enduring classic.

Like Benincasa’s Great , Segal’s debut novel transplants the action of a classic work (in this case, Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence ) into a modern setting with relative ease and some big returns. In The Innocents , we encounter an engaged pair (Adam and Rachel) that is about to embark on a wedding (and marriage) that is desired and encouraged by many. Wait, not so fast! Enter Ellie, Rachel’s wild cousin (and maybe something more to Adam?) and watch the sparks fly (and the hearts break).

The Peter Pan  storyline has been mined for modern works numerous times—from a YA novel that focuses on the romance between Tiger Lily and Peter to an entire series about how Mr. Pan becomes the character we know and love—but the most assuredly contemporary of all the stories is Sheinmel’s Second Star . Sheinmel’s thoroughly modern take on the J.M. Barrie classic imagines that the Darling boys are renegade teen surfers who purposely run away to join up with a hip surf gang. Wendy, of course, goes after them, only to find herself pulled into the club, too, thanks to the intriguing nature of their leader, Pete.

A monster assembled by a scientist from parts of dead bodies develops a mind of his own as he learns to loathe himself and hate his creator.

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