Menu:

Sinkiuse-Columbia - Wikipedia


Did you know the name "Missouri" is a Siouan Indian word? It comes from the tribal name Missouria, which means "big canoe people." The Missouri Indians were not the only native people of this region, however.

Most Native Americans were forced to leave Missouri during the Indian Removals of the 1800's. So, it is important to note that these tribes are not extinct, even though they do not live in Missouri anymore. They were moved to Indian reservations in Oklahoma where the majority live today.

There is a band from the Cherokee Nation who were able to break away during the time that the forced migration was occurring on the Trail of Tears through Missouri. This band continues to maintain an office in Missouri today, even though this band is not federally recognized, nor are there any reservations in the state for any tribal peoples. You can reach the band at:

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states. The National Park Service, in partnership with other federal agencies, state and local agencies, non-profit organizations, and private landowners, administers the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Participating national historic trail sites display the official trail logo.

Below are two maps depicting the route taken and highlights the Trail of Tears Historical Trail in a MO State Park that is located at:  

© 2018 — Curators of the University of Missouri . All rights reserved. DMCA and other copyright information . An equal opportunity/access/affirmative action/pro-disabled and veteran employer . Disability Resources . Published by the College of Arts & Science . Contact Web Group | Login

The Columbia Plateau is home to four major tribes that share similar languages, cultures, religions, and diets: the Nez Perce Tribe , the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation , the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon , and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation . These four tribes have a long history of interaction, including intermarriage, shared use of common resources like Celilo Falls , and extensive trade.

The people of these tribes share a common understanding that their very existence depends on the respectful enjoyment of the Columbia River Basin’s vast land and water resources. They believe their very souls and spirits were and are inextricably tied to the natural world and all its inhabitants. Among those inhabitants, none are more important than the millions of salmon that bring sustenance and prosperity to the region’s rivers and streams.

Despite some differences in language and cultural practices, the people of these tribes have long shared the foundation of a regional economy based on salmon. To the extent the resource permits, members of these tribes continue to fish for ceremonial, subsistence, and commercial purposes. They still maintain a dietary preference for salmon, consuming sometimes ten times the US average. For these tribes, salmon is important and necessary for their physical health and spiritual well being.

In 1855, the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Warm Springs and Yakama tribes each entered into a treaty with the US government, ceding millions of acres of their lands to the United States in exchange for peace and certain terms. Many of these terms involved the reservation of particular rights that were guaranteed to continue after their treaty was signed – not rights that the treaty granted, but rights the tribes held prior to the treaty that they demanded they continue to have. One was the right to harvest fish in all the tribes’ usual and accustomed areas. This included areas both on and off their reservations.

Today, perhaps even more than in the past, the Columbia River treaty tribes are brought together by the struggle to protect and restore their sacred First Food , the salmon.

The U.S. government’s policies towards Native Americans in the second half of the nineteenth century were influenced by the desire to expand westward into territories occupied by these Native American tribes. By the 1850s nearly all Native American tribes, roughly 360,000 in number, lived to the west of the Mississippi River. These American Indians, some from the Northwestern and Southeastern territories, were confined to Indian Territory located in present day Oklahoma, while the Kiowa and Comanche Native American tribes shared the land of the Southern Plains.

The Sioux, Crows and Blackfeet dominated the Northern Plains. These Native American groups encountered adversity as the steady flow of European immigrants into northeastern American cities pushed a stream of migrants into the western lands already occupied by these diverse groups of Indians.

The early nineteenth century in the United States was marked by its steady expansion to the Mississippi River. However, due to the Gadsden purchase, that lead to U.S. control of the borderlands of southern New Mexico and Arizona in addition to the authority over Oregon country, Texas and California; America’s expansion did not end there. Between 1830 and 1860 the United States nearly doubled the amount of territory under its control.

These territorial gains coincided with the arrival of troves of European and Asian immigrants who wished to join the surge of American settlers heading west. This, partnered with the discovery of gold in 1849, presented attractive opportunities for those willing to make the long journey westward. Consequently, with the military’s protection and the U.S. government’s assistance, many settlers began building their homesteads in the Great Plains and other parts of the Native American tribe inhabited West.

Native American Policy can be defined as the laws and operations developed and adapted in the United States to outline the relationship between Native American tribes and the federal government. When the United States first became an independent nation, it adopted the European policies towards these native peoples, but over the course of two centuries the U.S. adapted its own widely varying policies regarding the changing perspectives and necessities of Native American supervision.

With the steady flow of settlers into Indian controlled land, Eastern newspapers published sensationalized stories of cruel native tribes committing massive massacres of hundreds of white travelers. Although some settlers lost their lives to American Indian attacks, this was not the norm; in fact, Native American tribes often helped settlers cross the Plains. Not only did the American Indians sell wild game and other supplies to travelers, but they acted as guides and messengers between wagon trains as well. Despite the friendly natures of the American Indians, settlers still feared the possibility of an attack.

Did you know the name "Missouri" is a Siouan Indian word? It comes from the tribal name Missouria, which means "big canoe people." The Missouri Indians were not the only native people of this region, however.

Most Native Americans were forced to leave Missouri during the Indian Removals of the 1800's. So, it is important to note that these tribes are not extinct, even though they do not live in Missouri anymore. They were moved to Indian reservations in Oklahoma where the majority live today.

There is a band from the Cherokee Nation who were able to break away during the time that the forced migration was occurring on the Trail of Tears through Missouri. This band continues to maintain an office in Missouri today, even though this band is not federally recognized, nor are there any reservations in the state for any tribal peoples. You can reach the band at:

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states. The National Park Service, in partnership with other federal agencies, state and local agencies, non-profit organizations, and private landowners, administers the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Participating national historic trail sites display the official trail logo.

Below are two maps depicting the route taken and highlights the Trail of Tears Historical Trail in a MO State Park that is located at:  

© 2018 — Curators of the University of Missouri . All rights reserved. DMCA and other copyright information . An equal opportunity/access/affirmative action/pro-disabled and veteran employer . Disability Resources . Published by the College of Arts & Science . Contact Web Group | Login

Did you know the name "Missouri" is a Siouan Indian word? It comes from the tribal name Missouria, which means "big canoe people." The Missouri Indians were not the only native people of this region, however.

Most Native Americans were forced to leave Missouri during the Indian Removals of the 1800's. So, it is important to note that these tribes are not extinct, even though they do not live in Missouri anymore. They were moved to Indian reservations in Oklahoma where the majority live today.

There is a band from the Cherokee Nation who were able to break away during the time that the forced migration was occurring on the Trail of Tears through Missouri. This band continues to maintain an office in Missouri today, even though this band is not federally recognized, nor are there any reservations in the state for any tribal peoples. You can reach the band at:

The Trail of Tears National Historic Trail commemorates the removal of the Cherokee and the paths that 17 Cherokee detachments followed westward. Today the trail encompasses about 2,200 miles of land and water routes, and traverses portions of nine states. The National Park Service, in partnership with other federal agencies, state and local agencies, non-profit organizations, and private landowners, administers the Trail of Tears National Historic Trail. Participating national historic trail sites display the official trail logo.

Below are two maps depicting the route taken and highlights the Trail of Tears Historical Trail in a MO State Park that is located at:  

© 2018 — Curators of the University of Missouri . All rights reserved. DMCA and other copyright information . An equal opportunity/access/affirmative action/pro-disabled and veteran employer . Disability Resources . Published by the College of Arts & Science . Contact Web Group | Login

The Columbia Plateau is home to four major tribes that share similar languages, cultures, religions, and diets: the Nez Perce Tribe , the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation , the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon , and the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation . These four tribes have a long history of interaction, including intermarriage, shared use of common resources like Celilo Falls , and extensive trade.

The people of these tribes share a common understanding that their very existence depends on the respectful enjoyment of the Columbia River Basin’s vast land and water resources. They believe their very souls and spirits were and are inextricably tied to the natural world and all its inhabitants. Among those inhabitants, none are more important than the millions of salmon that bring sustenance and prosperity to the region’s rivers and streams.

Despite some differences in language and cultural practices, the people of these tribes have long shared the foundation of a regional economy based on salmon. To the extent the resource permits, members of these tribes continue to fish for ceremonial, subsistence, and commercial purposes. They still maintain a dietary preference for salmon, consuming sometimes ten times the US average. For these tribes, salmon is important and necessary for their physical health and spiritual well being.

In 1855, the Nez Perce, Umatilla, Warm Springs and Yakama tribes each entered into a treaty with the US government, ceding millions of acres of their lands to the United States in exchange for peace and certain terms. Many of these terms involved the reservation of particular rights that were guaranteed to continue after their treaty was signed – not rights that the treaty granted, but rights the tribes held prior to the treaty that they demanded they continue to have. One was the right to harvest fish in all the tribes’ usual and accustomed areas. This included areas both on and off their reservations.

Today, perhaps even more than in the past, the Columbia River treaty tribes are brought together by the struggle to protect and restore their sacred First Food , the salmon.


41K-nRuYeSL