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Catherine de Medici - Wikipedia


Henry was born at Monmouth on 16 December 1387, eldest son of Henry IV and Mary de Bohun, and succeeded his father in 1413. His life and reign, especially his conquests in France, are well known. A Te Deum for the victory of Agincourt, fought on St Crispin's Day (25 October) 1415 was sung before the shrine of St Edward the Confessor in the Abbey and Henry contributed money yearly towards the rebuilding of the nave. His figure is shown in a modern stained glass window on the north side of the nave (a memorial to Lord Kelvin).

A conference was held at Westminster School on 28 October 2015 discussing aspects of his funeral and the armour.  It is hoped the papers given will be published in due course.

Textiles from the funerary achievement of Henry V by Lisa Monnas, in Proceedings of the 2001 Harlaxton Symposium edited by J.Stratford, 2003

The Chapter Office
Westminster Abbey
20 Dean's Yard
London
SW1P 3PA
+44(0)20 7222  5152
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Catherine II , also Catherine of Valois or Catherine of Taranto (before 15 April 1303 – October 1346), was the recognised Latin Empress of Constantinople from 1307–1346, although she lived in exile and only had authority over Crusader States in Greece. She was Princess consort of Achaea and Taranto, and also regent of Achaea from 1332–1341, and Governor of Cephalonia from 1341–1346.

She was born in 1303, sometime before 15 April, the eldest daughter of Charles, count of Valois , and Catherine I . [1]

Her mother was recognized as Empress of the Latin Empire of Constantinople by the Latin states in Greece, despite the city having been captured by the Empire of Nicaea in 1261. Catherine inherited her claims as the titular Empress on 11 October 1307. [2] She was still a child and remained in the custody of her father, who managed her claims to the empire until his death in 1325.

In July 1313, Catherine married Philip I of Taranto , King of Albania and Prince of Achaea , who was the younger brother of Robert, King of Naples . [4] She associated her husband as titular Emperor (Philip II), and retained the claim to the empire after his death on 23 December 1332. Robert , his eldest surviving son, succeeded him as Prince of Taranto in 1331. Catherine became influential at the court of Naples.

Her court was more worldly than the pious court of King Robert and his pious wife, Sancha of Majorca . During the reign of her niece, Joanna I of Naples , she opposed the marriage of Joan's younger sister, Maria of Calabria , to Charles, Duke of Durazzo . This was because Maria was heir presumptive to the throne of Naples, and the Durazzos were rivals to her own family. She and her family were compensated with a cash settlement from the royal treasury.

In 1333, her son Robert received the Principality of Achaea through an agreement with his uncle, John of Gravina . [5] However, the thirteen-year-old boy was deemed too young to reign alone, and his mother became his co-ruler for the rest of her life. Initially ruling through appointed baillis , in summer 1338 Catherine mustered a fleet and took her whole household to Achaea, where she took an active part in its government. She gave refuge to Nikephoros II Orsini of Epirus , and supported him in his attempt to assert himself in his land against the Byzantine Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos .

Henry was born at Monmouth on 16 December 1387, eldest son of Henry IV and Mary de Bohun, and succeeded his father in 1413. His life and reign, especially his conquests in France, are well known. A Te Deum for the victory of Agincourt, fought on St Crispin's Day (25 October) 1415 was sung before the shrine of St Edward the Confessor in the Abbey and Henry contributed money yearly towards the rebuilding of the nave. His figure is shown in a modern stained glass window on the north side of the nave (a memorial to Lord Kelvin).

A conference was held at Westminster School on 28 October 2015 discussing aspects of his funeral and the armour.  It is hoped the papers given will be published in due course.

Textiles from the funerary achievement of Henry V by Lisa Monnas, in Proceedings of the 2001 Harlaxton Symposium edited by J.Stratford, 2003

The Chapter Office
Westminster Abbey
20 Dean's Yard
London
SW1P 3PA
+44(0)20 7222  5152
[email protected]

Henry was born at Monmouth on 16 December 1387, eldest son of Henry IV and Mary de Bohun, and succeeded his father in 1413. His life and reign, especially his conquests in France, are well known. A Te Deum for the victory of Agincourt, fought on St Crispin's Day (25 October) 1415 was sung before the shrine of St Edward the Confessor in the Abbey and Henry contributed money yearly towards the rebuilding of the nave. His figure is shown in a modern stained glass window on the north side of the nave (a memorial to Lord Kelvin).

A conference was held at Westminster School on 28 October 2015 discussing aspects of his funeral and the armour.  It is hoped the papers given will be published in due course.

Textiles from the funerary achievement of Henry V by Lisa Monnas, in Proceedings of the 2001 Harlaxton Symposium edited by J.Stratford, 2003

The Chapter Office
Westminster Abbey
20 Dean's Yard
London
SW1P 3PA
+44(0)20 7222  5152
[email protected]

Catherine II , also Catherine of Valois or Catherine of Taranto (before 15 April 1303 – October 1346), was the recognised Latin Empress of Constantinople from 1307–1346, although she lived in exile and only had authority over Crusader States in Greece. She was Princess consort of Achaea and Taranto, and also regent of Achaea from 1332–1341, and Governor of Cephalonia from 1341–1346.

She was born in 1303, sometime before 15 April, the eldest daughter of Charles, count of Valois , and Catherine I . [1]

Her mother was recognized as Empress of the Latin Empire of Constantinople by the Latin states in Greece, despite the city having been captured by the Empire of Nicaea in 1261. Catherine inherited her claims as the titular Empress on 11 October 1307. [2] She was still a child and remained in the custody of her father, who managed her claims to the empire until his death in 1325.

In July 1313, Catherine married Philip I of Taranto , King of Albania and Prince of Achaea , who was the younger brother of Robert, King of Naples . [4] She associated her husband as titular Emperor (Philip II), and retained the claim to the empire after his death on 23 December 1332. Robert , his eldest surviving son, succeeded him as Prince of Taranto in 1331. Catherine became influential at the court of Naples.

Her court was more worldly than the pious court of King Robert and his pious wife, Sancha of Majorca . During the reign of her niece, Joanna I of Naples , she opposed the marriage of Joan's younger sister, Maria of Calabria , to Charles, Duke of Durazzo . This was because Maria was heir presumptive to the throne of Naples, and the Durazzos were rivals to her own family. She and her family were compensated with a cash settlement from the royal treasury.

In 1333, her son Robert received the Principality of Achaea through an agreement with his uncle, John of Gravina . [5] However, the thirteen-year-old boy was deemed too young to reign alone, and his mother became his co-ruler for the rest of her life. Initially ruling through appointed baillis , in summer 1338 Catherine mustered a fleet and took her whole household to Achaea, where she took an active part in its government. She gave refuge to Nikephoros II Orsini of Epirus , and supported him in his attempt to assert himself in his land against the Byzantine Emperor Andronikos III Palaiologos .

There are some who say that Catherine had a fairy tale marriage to King Henry V of England. While this may be true, unfortunately it didn’t last long. After a short period of widowhood, she then made what was considered an ill-advised marriage to a man of the Welsh gentry. Although controversial, the marriage was recognized as legal and the children born to Catherine were considered legitimate and would lead to the founding of the Tudor dynasty.

Catherine was born on October 27, 1401 at the Hotel St Pol in Paris. She was the daughter of King Charles VI of France and his queen, Isabeau of Bavaria . Due to her father’s mental illness, the poverty of the royal family and political divisions between the Armagnacs and the Burgundians in France, Catherine may have experienced some instability in her early life. However, her mother was very close to her children and bought them many toys, clothes and gifts. When she wasn’t with her children, Isabeau wrote them letters and when plague broke out, she ensured they were sent to safety in the countryside away from the contagion.

Catherine’s marriage was discussed very early in her life. She was conditionally betrothed on June 18, 1403 to Charles, the grandson and heir of Louis, Duke of Bourbon. In 1404, Catherine and her sister Marie were sent to the convent of Poissy to protect them from the chaos of the infighting at court. At Poissy, the princesses were given an education suitable for their rank. In 1408, King Henry IV of England expressed an interest in promoting peace between England and France. He suggested his son Henry should marry a French princess.

Catherine’s name was brought up as a possible bride for Prince Henry again and again by diplomats for the next ten years. In 1413, King Henry IV died and his son took the throne as Henry V. Catherine returned to court from Poissy and serious discussions for her marriage began in November. In addition to Catherine’s hand, Henry was asking for the return of Aquitaine and a payment of two million crowns. A portrait of Catherine, now lost, was commissioned and brought to England in February of 1415. The French found Henry’s terms onerous and rejected them. They feared Henry would renew his claim to the French throne. This spurred Henry to plan and execute an invasion of France.

Henry won the battle of Agincourt on October 25, 1415. It wasn’t a decisive victory but Henry returned to England as a hero. On December 8, 1415, Catherine’s brother Louis died. Then her next brother died sixteen months later. This left her brother Charles as the Dauphin at the age of twelve and the king’s mental illness was at its worst. Catherine and her mother became very close. Isabeau realized her daughter was a great asset to France and Catherine was now insisting she wanted to marry Henry.

Henry returned to France in 1417 and began taking territory in Normandy. At the end of 1418, Rouen had fallen and a conference was called at Melun. Isabeau made sure Catherine was there. She is described as being beautiful with a gracious manner, an oval face, a complexion of ivory and large dark eyes. The couple met on June 2 and Henry was quite taken with Catherine, making the meeting a success. Henry chivalrously kissed Catherine and she modestly blushed. They then said a respectful goodbye.


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