Menu:

How to Keep Your Kidneys Healthy - WebMD


Ice causes all kinds of problems for cars. It’s dangerous to drive on, it obscures your windshield, and sometimes it keeps you from even getting inside. These tips will prevent your car doors and locks from freezing shut, and help you get into your car if they do.

Car doors usually freeze shut because rain or melted snow seeps into the cracks of your vehicle and gets in between the rubber gaskets on your door. That’s why Cheryl Knight at Your Mechanic suggests you inspect the gaskets before they become a problem . Check to make sure they’re not worn, torn, or dirty. Any gaps, tears, or openings will let moisture in where it can become frozen super glue. If your door gasket has seen better days, have it replaced by a mechanic, or replace it yourself .

If your gasket and door frame are just dirty, give them a good cleaning. Knight explains that dirt and debris can also prevent the gasket from making a good seal. Use a clean cloth and warm water to wipe down the door frame and gasket, then follow up with a dry cloth to ensure there’s no leftover moisture. Make sure you go over both the gasket on the vehicle’s frame and the gasket on the door itself. And if possible, do this inside a garage or somewhere warm so the water doesn’t freeze while you wipe things down.

Covering your car or parking it a garage are the best ice prevention measures you can take, but that’s not always an option. Fortunately, there are a couple other things you can do. First, youtuber EricTheCarGuy recommends you spray down your door’s gasket with a silicone lubricant spray, then spread it out evenly with a microfiber cloth. The silicone repels moisture and will keep any water from getting in between gaskets.

Silicone lubricant spray is pretty cheap too— about $8 or $9 a can —and you can find it any auto parts store, or in the automotive section of the department store. If you don’t have any silicone spray, or can’t make it to the store to get some, cooking spray will work too .

A little foresight can go a long way when it comes to opening a frozen car door. When you park your car for the night, Bob Kazee, the parts manager at International Collision Repair , suggests you stick a towel or rag between the car door and door frame just above the window. That way when you go to open your door in the morning, you have two points to pull from, and you won’t snap the door handle.

How many times have you bought a fresh bunch of rosemary or basil for a recipe, only to find it in your fridge just a few days later, wilted and brown? Even though we know that cooking with fresh herbs can mean the difference between a mediocre meal and one bursting with flavor, it's really frustrating to, quite literally, throw money away. What a waste.

Some of those herbs can be fairly pricey; and if you need more than one type for a recipe, you can easily throw down $10 on these flavorful stems alone. You could create an entire meal with that money or you could treat yourself to a nice brunch. There are countless ways you could better spend your money than on the 48-hour fleeting freshness of herbs.

But lucky for us, there's a simple solution. Those of us who don't have access to a garden of fresh herbs can still cook with them without feeling wasteful -- the secret is in how you store them. There are quite a few tricks we can turn to that can make fresh herbs last in their brightest green state for about two weeks. So if you don't have the space, or the green thumb, to grow your own herbs, worry not. You still have a few options:

The Wrapping Method
If storing your herbs in water makes you a little nervous, (i.e. you're afraid you'll knock over the glass while rummaging through your fridge), the wrapping method may be best suited for you. This method tells you to wrap fresh herbs in a wet paper towel and store them in a resealable bag. The idea behind this is to keep the herbs in a moist -- not wet -- environment. You should check on them every couple of days, and if the paper towel feels dry you can either spray the bag with a bit of water or re-wrap the herbs in new moist paper towels. Place them in your crisper or the door compartment for the best results.

This method works particularly well for herbs such as cilantro and parsley, though can be used with any herb. If dealing with rosemary or thyme a more subtle approach should be practiced, as these woodier herbs tend to mold if around too much water -- be sure that the paper towels aren't too moist and check on them every couple of days.

The "Green" Wrapping Method
If you are "greening" your kitchen and want to avoid using plastic bags and paper towels, another successful method for keeping your herbs fresh is to wrap them in a moist kitchen towel -- no plastic bag necessary -- and store them in the crisper. You should check on it every couple of days to make sure the towel hasn't dried out.

You know that exercise and a good diet can keep your heart healthy. But what else can you do to keep your ticker going strong? Here are five key things you need to do every day to help your heart work most efficiently.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

You know that exercise and a good diet can keep your heart healthy. But what else can you do to keep your ticker going strong? Here are five key things you need to do every day to help your heart work most efficiently. Incorporate these habits into your lifestyle and your heart health will be the best it can be for you.

We need fats in our diet, including saturated and polyunsaturated and unsaturated fats. One fat we don’t need is trans fat , which is known to increase your risk of developing heart disease or having a stroke over a lifetime. This is because trans fat clogs your arteries by raising your bad cholesterol levels (LDL) and lowering your good cholesterol levels (HDL). By cutting them from your diet, you improve the blood flow throughout your body. So, what are trans fats? They are industry-produced fats often used in packaged baked goods, snack foods, margarines and fried fast foods to add flavor and texture.

Tip : Read the labels on all foods. Trans fat appears on the ingredients list as partially hydrogenated oils. Look for 0 percent trans fat. Make it a point to avoid eating foods with trans fat.

Dental health is a good indication of overall health, including your heart, because those who have periodontal (gum) disease often have the same risk factors for heart disease. Studies continue on this issue, but many have shown that bacteria in the mouth involved in the development of gum disease can move into the bloodstream and cause an elevation in C-reactive protein, a marker for inflammation in the blood vessels. These changes may in turn, increase your risk of heart disease and stroke.

Ice causes all kinds of problems for cars. It’s dangerous to drive on, it obscures your windshield, and sometimes it keeps you from even getting inside. These tips will prevent your car doors and locks from freezing shut, and help you get into your car if they do.

Car doors usually freeze shut because rain or melted snow seeps into the cracks of your vehicle and gets in between the rubber gaskets on your door. That’s why Cheryl Knight at Your Mechanic suggests you inspect the gaskets before they become a problem . Check to make sure they’re not worn, torn, or dirty. Any gaps, tears, or openings will let moisture in where it can become frozen super glue. If your door gasket has seen better days, have it replaced by a mechanic, or replace it yourself .

If your gasket and door frame are just dirty, give them a good cleaning. Knight explains that dirt and debris can also prevent the gasket from making a good seal. Use a clean cloth and warm water to wipe down the door frame and gasket, then follow up with a dry cloth to ensure there’s no leftover moisture. Make sure you go over both the gasket on the vehicle’s frame and the gasket on the door itself. And if possible, do this inside a garage or somewhere warm so the water doesn’t freeze while you wipe things down.

Covering your car or parking it a garage are the best ice prevention measures you can take, but that’s not always an option. Fortunately, there are a couple other things you can do. First, youtuber EricTheCarGuy recommends you spray down your door’s gasket with a silicone lubricant spray, then spread it out evenly with a microfiber cloth. The silicone repels moisture and will keep any water from getting in between gaskets.

Silicone lubricant spray is pretty cheap too— about $8 or $9 a can —and you can find it any auto parts store, or in the automotive section of the department store. If you don’t have any silicone spray, or can’t make it to the store to get some, cooking spray will work too .

A little foresight can go a long way when it comes to opening a frozen car door. When you park your car for the night, Bob Kazee, the parts manager at International Collision Repair , suggests you stick a towel or rag between the car door and door frame just above the window. That way when you go to open your door in the morning, you have two points to pull from, and you won’t snap the door handle.

Ice causes all kinds of problems for cars. It’s dangerous to drive on, it obscures your windshield, and sometimes it keeps you from even getting inside. These tips will prevent your car doors and locks from freezing shut, and help you get into your car if they do.

Car doors usually freeze shut because rain or melted snow seeps into the cracks of your vehicle and gets in between the rubber gaskets on your door. That’s why Cheryl Knight at Your Mechanic suggests you inspect the gaskets before they become a problem . Check to make sure they’re not worn, torn, or dirty. Any gaps, tears, or openings will let moisture in where it can become frozen super glue. If your door gasket has seen better days, have it replaced by a mechanic, or replace it yourself .

If your gasket and door frame are just dirty, give them a good cleaning. Knight explains that dirt and debris can also prevent the gasket from making a good seal. Use a clean cloth and warm water to wipe down the door frame and gasket, then follow up with a dry cloth to ensure there’s no leftover moisture. Make sure you go over both the gasket on the vehicle’s frame and the gasket on the door itself. And if possible, do this inside a garage or somewhere warm so the water doesn’t freeze while you wipe things down.

Covering your car or parking it a garage are the best ice prevention measures you can take, but that’s not always an option. Fortunately, there are a couple other things you can do. First, youtuber EricTheCarGuy recommends you spray down your door’s gasket with a silicone lubricant spray, then spread it out evenly with a microfiber cloth. The silicone repels moisture and will keep any water from getting in between gaskets.

Silicone lubricant spray is pretty cheap too— about $8 or $9 a can —and you can find it any auto parts store, or in the automotive section of the department store. If you don’t have any silicone spray, or can’t make it to the store to get some, cooking spray will work too .

A little foresight can go a long way when it comes to opening a frozen car door. When you park your car for the night, Bob Kazee, the parts manager at International Collision Repair , suggests you stick a towel or rag between the car door and door frame just above the window. That way when you go to open your door in the morning, you have two points to pull from, and you won’t snap the door handle.

How many times have you bought a fresh bunch of rosemary or basil for a recipe, only to find it in your fridge just a few days later, wilted and brown? Even though we know that cooking with fresh herbs can mean the difference between a mediocre meal and one bursting with flavor, it's really frustrating to, quite literally, throw money away. What a waste.

Some of those herbs can be fairly pricey; and if you need more than one type for a recipe, you can easily throw down $10 on these flavorful stems alone. You could create an entire meal with that money or you could treat yourself to a nice brunch. There are countless ways you could better spend your money than on the 48-hour fleeting freshness of herbs.

But lucky for us, there's a simple solution. Those of us who don't have access to a garden of fresh herbs can still cook with them without feeling wasteful -- the secret is in how you store them. There are quite a few tricks we can turn to that can make fresh herbs last in their brightest green state for about two weeks. So if you don't have the space, or the green thumb, to grow your own herbs, worry not. You still have a few options:

The Wrapping Method
If storing your herbs in water makes you a little nervous, (i.e. you're afraid you'll knock over the glass while rummaging through your fridge), the wrapping method may be best suited for you. This method tells you to wrap fresh herbs in a wet paper towel and store them in a resealable bag. The idea behind this is to keep the herbs in a moist -- not wet -- environment. You should check on them every couple of days, and if the paper towel feels dry you can either spray the bag with a bit of water or re-wrap the herbs in new moist paper towels. Place them in your crisper or the door compartment for the best results.

This method works particularly well for herbs such as cilantro and parsley, though can be used with any herb. If dealing with rosemary or thyme a more subtle approach should be practiced, as these woodier herbs tend to mold if around too much water -- be sure that the paper towels aren't too moist and check on them every couple of days.

The "Green" Wrapping Method
If you are "greening" your kitchen and want to avoid using plastic bags and paper towels, another successful method for keeping your herbs fresh is to wrap them in a moist kitchen towel -- no plastic bag necessary -- and store them in the crisper. You should check on it every couple of days to make sure the towel hasn't dried out.


61L321doLNL