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The Steagles were the team created by the temporary merger of two National Football League (NFL) teams, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles , during the 1943 season . The teams were forced to merge because both had lost many players to military service during World War II . The league's official record book refers to the team as "Phil-Pitt Combine", [1] but the unofficial "Steagles", despite never being registered by the NFL, has become the enduring moniker. [2]

The prospect of a unified Pittsburgh-Philadelphia team actually predated World War II by several years. The Pennsylvania Keystoners were a team that was proposed in 1939, conceived with the intention of the Steelers and Eagles owners buying into one of the two teams, then spinning the other off to an ownership group in Boston, Massachusetts. League officials rejected the plan, though it resulted in a convoluted ownership "two-step" that left Eagles owner Bert Bell with a share in the Steelers franchise.

America entered World War II on December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor . Most of the young men who were of the age to play professional football were also of the age to fight for their country. 600 NFL players joined the armed forces.

Even with these deferments, NFL rosters were hurting. The Cleveland Rams suspended operations and the Pittsburgh Steelers had only six men left under contract while the Philadelphia Eagles had only sixteen. The 1943 NFL Draft did not help much. Most players drafted went off to the war instead of joining NFL teams. Further exacerbating the issue was the continued insistence of George Preston Marshall and other NFL owners on continuing the ten-year-old ban on black players , which disqualified potential replacement players such as Kenny Washington . The league nearly ceased operations before the 1943 season, but it continued. [ citation needed ]

Steelers' owner Art Rooney knew that the league needed at least eight teams to survive. [ citation needed ] Rooney's idea was to merge the Steelers with the Eagles. [4] This idea came quickly to him since two years earlier he thought about combining the two teams into the Pennsylvania Keystoners . Eagles' owner Alexis Thompson , who was serving in the US Army as a corporal , was not as keen on the plan since he at least had 16 players under contract. However Thompson remembered how Rooney in 1941 swapped cities with him, allowing him to keep the Eagles in Philadelphia, close to his New York City home. This led to an agreement on combining the teams.

As the season got underway, fans and newspapers began calling the team the Steagles, a combination of Steelers and Eagles. It had a nice ring to it and was fair to both cities. Steagles eventually became the common name used for the team throughout most of the country, except in Philadelphia, where the writers and even the team insisted on being called the Philadelphia Eagles. Chet Smith, the sports editor of the Pittsburgh Press , was initially the one who wrote in a column the moniker Steagles, for the merged team [12] (and according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ).

According to New Age philosophy, our world is moving from a period of formal religion (the Age of Pisces) to the Age of Enlightenment (or the Age of Aquarius). This change from one period to another occurs under the guidance of enlightened ones who have accumulated great wisdom.

Occultist David Anrias tells us that the nine so-called “Great Ones” who have inspired the cycles of humankind are supposedly so advanced in their thinking and approach that their teachings fall like music on the ears of humankind:

New Age followers are awaiting the Maitreya , or the Christ, who will assist humankind in its rebirth. According to this doctrine, Maitreya is appearing as Christ to the Christians, as Krishna to the Hindus, as the Imam Madhi to the Muslims, and as the Bodhisattva to the Orient.

Called World Teacher, He will allegedly preside over the destiny of the great religions. This is not Jesus Christ, but rather a false Christ. The Maitreya Educational Foundation says this on its website :

Benjamin Creme , a British artist and esoteric, is a channel and key publicist for Maitreya. His magazines of channeled messages from Maitreya have been used as information documents for the United Nations. Creme has written many books—supposed channeled works from Maitreya—discussing Maitreya's appearance on Earth. Maitreya makes these claims in Creme's book The Reappearance of the Christ and the Masters of Wisdom :

Uniting the nations in rejection of God's truth has always been Satan's strategy. He attempted it at Babel , and God separated the nations. He will attempt the same at the end of time—uniting the Earth under the false law of Satan, spread by the Antichrist .

Certification that an organization meets the reviewing organization's standards. Examples: accreditation of HMOs by the National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) or accreditation of hospitals by the Joint Commission of Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO).

An employee must work for the employer on a regular basis in the usual course of the employer's business to be considered an active, full-time employee and eligible for coverage. Usually, a minimum number of hours of regular work is specified.

An arrangement in which an employer contracts with a third party, typically a health care carrier, to administer the health care plan for the employer who assumes the benefit plan claim risk.  In an ASO arrangement, the third party processes the claims on the employer's behalf and the funds to pay the claims come from the employer. This is also referred to as self funded.

An organization offering a "non-traditional" ("not like a hospital") setting for giving birth. Alternative birthing centers can range from free-standing centers to special areas within hospitals. Birthing centers are generally known for a more comfortable, home-like atmosphere. They allow the father to participate more. They're also more flexible than hospitals in allowing changes to the standard procedures followed during a birth.

A general term for care that doesn't involve admission to an inpatient hospital bed. Visits to a doctor's office are a type of ambulatory care.

Surgical procedures that do not require an overnight hospital stay. Procedures can be performed in a hospital or a licensed surgical center. Also called outpatient surgery.

The Steagles were the team created by the temporary merger of two National Football League (NFL) teams, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles , during the 1943 season . The teams were forced to merge because both had lost many players to military service during World War II . The league's official record book refers to the team as "Phil-Pitt Combine", [1] but the unofficial "Steagles", despite never being registered by the NFL, has become the enduring moniker. [2]

The prospect of a unified Pittsburgh-Philadelphia team actually predated World War II by several years. The Pennsylvania Keystoners were a team that was proposed in 1939, conceived with the intention of the Steelers and Eagles owners buying into one of the two teams, then spinning the other off to an ownership group in Boston, Massachusetts. League officials rejected the plan, though it resulted in a convoluted ownership "two-step" that left Eagles owner Bert Bell with a share in the Steelers franchise.

America entered World War II on December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor . Most of the young men who were of the age to play professional football were also of the age to fight for their country. 600 NFL players joined the armed forces.

Even with these deferments, NFL rosters were hurting. The Cleveland Rams suspended operations and the Pittsburgh Steelers had only six men left under contract while the Philadelphia Eagles had only sixteen. The 1943 NFL Draft did not help much. Most players drafted went off to the war instead of joining NFL teams. Further exacerbating the issue was the continued insistence of George Preston Marshall and other NFL owners on continuing the ten-year-old ban on black players , which disqualified potential replacement players such as Kenny Washington . The league nearly ceased operations before the 1943 season, but it continued. [ citation needed ]

Steelers' owner Art Rooney knew that the league needed at least eight teams to survive. [ citation needed ] Rooney's idea was to merge the Steelers with the Eagles. [4] This idea came quickly to him since two years earlier he thought about combining the two teams into the Pennsylvania Keystoners . Eagles' owner Alexis Thompson , who was serving in the US Army as a corporal , was not as keen on the plan since he at least had 16 players under contract. However Thompson remembered how Rooney in 1941 swapped cities with him, allowing him to keep the Eagles in Philadelphia, close to his New York City home. This led to an agreement on combining the teams.

As the season got underway, fans and newspapers began calling the team the Steagles, a combination of Steelers and Eagles. It had a nice ring to it and was fair to both cities. Steagles eventually became the common name used for the team throughout most of the country, except in Philadelphia, where the writers and even the team insisted on being called the Philadelphia Eagles. Chet Smith, the sports editor of the Pittsburgh Press , was initially the one who wrote in a column the moniker Steagles, for the merged team [12] (and according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ).

According to New Age philosophy, our world is moving from a period of formal religion (the Age of Pisces) to the Age of Enlightenment (or the Age of Aquarius). This change from one period to another occurs under the guidance of enlightened ones who have accumulated great wisdom.

Occultist David Anrias tells us that the nine so-called “Great Ones” who have inspired the cycles of humankind are supposedly so advanced in their thinking and approach that their teachings fall like music on the ears of humankind:

New Age followers are awaiting the Maitreya , or the Christ, who will assist humankind in its rebirth. According to this doctrine, Maitreya is appearing as Christ to the Christians, as Krishna to the Hindus, as the Imam Madhi to the Muslims, and as the Bodhisattva to the Orient.

Called World Teacher, He will allegedly preside over the destiny of the great religions. This is not Jesus Christ, but rather a false Christ. The Maitreya Educational Foundation says this on its website :

Benjamin Creme , a British artist and esoteric, is a channel and key publicist for Maitreya. His magazines of channeled messages from Maitreya have been used as information documents for the United Nations. Creme has written many books—supposed channeled works from Maitreya—discussing Maitreya's appearance on Earth. Maitreya makes these claims in Creme's book The Reappearance of the Christ and the Masters of Wisdom :

Uniting the nations in rejection of God's truth has always been Satan's strategy. He attempted it at Babel , and God separated the nations. He will attempt the same at the end of time—uniting the Earth under the false law of Satan, spread by the Antichrist .

The Steagles were the team created by the temporary merger of two National Football League (NFL) teams, the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Philadelphia Eagles , during the 1943 season . The teams were forced to merge because both had lost many players to military service during World War II . The league's official record book refers to the team as "Phil-Pitt Combine", [1] but the unofficial "Steagles", despite never being registered by the NFL, has become the enduring moniker. [2]

The prospect of a unified Pittsburgh-Philadelphia team actually predated World War II by several years. The Pennsylvania Keystoners were a team that was proposed in 1939, conceived with the intention of the Steelers and Eagles owners buying into one of the two teams, then spinning the other off to an ownership group in Boston, Massachusetts. League officials rejected the plan, though it resulted in a convoluted ownership "two-step" that left Eagles owner Bert Bell with a share in the Steelers franchise.

America entered World War II on December 7, 1941 with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor . Most of the young men who were of the age to play professional football were also of the age to fight for their country. 600 NFL players joined the armed forces.

Even with these deferments, NFL rosters were hurting. The Cleveland Rams suspended operations and the Pittsburgh Steelers had only six men left under contract while the Philadelphia Eagles had only sixteen. The 1943 NFL Draft did not help much. Most players drafted went off to the war instead of joining NFL teams. Further exacerbating the issue was the continued insistence of George Preston Marshall and other NFL owners on continuing the ten-year-old ban on black players , which disqualified potential replacement players such as Kenny Washington . The league nearly ceased operations before the 1943 season, but it continued. [ citation needed ]

Steelers' owner Art Rooney knew that the league needed at least eight teams to survive. [ citation needed ] Rooney's idea was to merge the Steelers with the Eagles. [4] This idea came quickly to him since two years earlier he thought about combining the two teams into the Pennsylvania Keystoners . Eagles' owner Alexis Thompson , who was serving in the US Army as a corporal , was not as keen on the plan since he at least had 16 players under contract. However Thompson remembered how Rooney in 1941 swapped cities with him, allowing him to keep the Eagles in Philadelphia, close to his New York City home. This led to an agreement on combining the teams.

As the season got underway, fans and newspapers began calling the team the Steagles, a combination of Steelers and Eagles. It had a nice ring to it and was fair to both cities. Steagles eventually became the common name used for the team throughout most of the country, except in Philadelphia, where the writers and even the team insisted on being called the Philadelphia Eagles. Chet Smith, the sports editor of the Pittsburgh Press , was initially the one who wrote in a column the moniker Steagles, for the merged team [12] (and according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ).


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