Menu:

A Short History of the World (H. G. Wells) - Wikipedia


The idea for the first FSP is credited to various people, most notably Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace and the program's first Administrator Milo Perkins. The program operated by permitting people on relief to buy orange stamps equal to their normal food expenditures; for every $1 worth of orange stamps purchased, 50 cents worth of blue stamps were received. Orange stamps could be used to buy any food; blue stamps could only be used to buy food determined by the Department to be surplus.

Over the course of nearly 4 years, the first FSP reached approximately 20 million people at one time or another in nearly half of the counties in the U.S.--peak participation was 4 million--at a total cost of $262 million. The first recipient was Mabel McFiggin of Rochester, New York; the first retailer to redeem the stamps was Joseph Mutolo; and the first retailer caught violating the program was Nick Salzano in October 1939. The program ended "since the conditions that brought the program into being--unmarketable food surpluses and widespread unemployment--no longer existed."

"We got a picture of a gorge, with farm surpluses on one cliff and under-nourished city folks with outstretched hands on the other. We set out to find a practical way to build a bridge across that chasm."
                                               ( Milo Perkins )

The 18 years between the end of the first FSP and the inception of the next were filled with studies, reports, and legislative proposals.

Prominent Senators actively associated with attempts to enact an FSP during this period were: Aiken, La Follette, Humphrey, Kefauver, and Symington. From 1954 on, Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan strove unceasingly to pass food stamp program legislation. On Sept. 21, 1959, P.L. 86-341 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to operate a food stamp system through Jan. 31, 1962.

Mr. and Mrs. Alderson Muncy of Paynesville, West Virginia, were the first food stamp recipients on May 29, 1961. They purchased $95 in food stamps for their 15-person household. In the first food stamp transaction, they bought a can of pork and beans at Henderson's Supermarket. By January 1964, the pilot programs had expanded from eight areas to 43 (40 counties, Detroit, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh) in 22 States with 380,000 participants.

It’s iconic, but Microsoft wishes it wasn’t. In the 90s it was as core to the Windows experience as Paint and Solitaire, but these days it’s not seen very often.

I’m talking, of course, about the Blue Screen of Death . Younger PC users have no idea how common this panic-inducing screen once was, or what it meant. Whatever you were working on was gone, and your computer needed to restart, something that took ten minutes at the time.

To this day, the Blue Screen is a recognizable symbol of things not working, but why did it exist in the first place? Here’s a little trip down the sketchy part of Memory Lane your parents told you not to visit.

Windows 3.1 didn’t have a blue screen of death: when it totally crashed, you ended up on a black screen. If you were lucky that black screen was the DOS prompt, from which you could launch Windows again. If not, it was time to reset.

There was, however, a blue screen triggerd by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete. This would go on to inspire the design of the Blue Screen of Death to come later.

Interestingly, as a blog post by Raymond Chen points out, the text here was written by none other than future CEO Steve Balmer, back when he ran the Systems Division at Microsoft.

A Short History of the World is a period-piece non-fictional historic work by English author H. G. Wells first published by Cassell & Co, Ltd Publishing in 1922. [1] It was first published in Penguin Books in 1936. It was republished under Penguin Classics in 2006. The book was largely inspired by Wells's earlier 1919 work The Outline of History . [2]

The book is 344 pages in total, [3] summarising the scientific knowledge of the time regarding the history of Earth and life. It starts with its origins , goes on to explain the development of the Earth and life on Earth , [4] reaching primitive thought and the development of humankind from the Cradle of Civilisation . [5] The book ends with the outcome of the First World War , the Russian famine of 1921 , and the League of Nations in 1922. [6] [7] In 1934 Albert Einstein recommended the book for the study of history as a means of interpreting progress in civilisation. [8]

The Nazi Party was a political party in Germany, led by Adolf Hitler from 1921 to 1945, whose central tenets included the supremacy of the Aryan people and blaming Jews and others for the problems within Germany. These extreme beliefs eventually led to World War II and the Holocaust . At the end of World War II, the Nazi Party was declared illegal by the occupying Allied Powers and officially ceased to exist in May 1945.

(The name “Nazi” is actually a shortened version of the party’s full name: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP, which translates to “National Socialist German Workers’ Party.”)

In the immediate post-World-War-I period, Germany was the scene of widespread political infighting between groups representing the far left and far right.  The Weimar Republic (the name of the German government from the end of WWI to 1933) was struggling as a result of its tarnished birth accompanied by the Treaty of Versailles and the fringe groups sought to take advantage of this political unrest.

It was in this environment that a locksmith, Anton Drexler , joined together with his journalist friend, Karl Harrer, and two other individuals (journalist Dietrich Eckhart and German economist Gottfried Feder ) to create a right-wing political party, the German Workers’ Party, on January 5, 1919.

After his service in the German Army ( Reichswehr ) during World War I , Adolf Hitler had difficulty re-integrating into civilian society.

This job appealed to Hitler, particularly because it allowed him to feel that was still serving a purpose to the military for which he would have eagerly given his life.  On September 12, 1919, this position took him to a meeting of the German Worker’s Party (DAP).

The idea for the first FSP is credited to various people, most notably Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace and the program's first Administrator Milo Perkins. The program operated by permitting people on relief to buy orange stamps equal to their normal food expenditures; for every $1 worth of orange stamps purchased, 50 cents worth of blue stamps were received. Orange stamps could be used to buy any food; blue stamps could only be used to buy food determined by the Department to be surplus.

Over the course of nearly 4 years, the first FSP reached approximately 20 million people at one time or another in nearly half of the counties in the U.S.--peak participation was 4 million--at a total cost of $262 million. The first recipient was Mabel McFiggin of Rochester, New York; the first retailer to redeem the stamps was Joseph Mutolo; and the first retailer caught violating the program was Nick Salzano in October 1939. The program ended "since the conditions that brought the program into being--unmarketable food surpluses and widespread unemployment--no longer existed."

"We got a picture of a gorge, with farm surpluses on one cliff and under-nourished city folks with outstretched hands on the other. We set out to find a practical way to build a bridge across that chasm."
                                               ( Milo Perkins )

The 18 years between the end of the first FSP and the inception of the next were filled with studies, reports, and legislative proposals.

Prominent Senators actively associated with attempts to enact an FSP during this period were: Aiken, La Follette, Humphrey, Kefauver, and Symington. From 1954 on, Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan strove unceasingly to pass food stamp program legislation. On Sept. 21, 1959, P.L. 86-341 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to operate a food stamp system through Jan. 31, 1962.

Mr. and Mrs. Alderson Muncy of Paynesville, West Virginia, were the first food stamp recipients on May 29, 1961. They purchased $95 in food stamps for their 15-person household. In the first food stamp transaction, they bought a can of pork and beans at Henderson's Supermarket. By January 1964, the pilot programs had expanded from eight areas to 43 (40 counties, Detroit, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh) in 22 States with 380,000 participants.

It’s iconic, but Microsoft wishes it wasn’t. In the 90s it was as core to the Windows experience as Paint and Solitaire, but these days it’s not seen very often.

I’m talking, of course, about the Blue Screen of Death . Younger PC users have no idea how common this panic-inducing screen once was, or what it meant. Whatever you were working on was gone, and your computer needed to restart, something that took ten minutes at the time.

To this day, the Blue Screen is a recognizable symbol of things not working, but why did it exist in the first place? Here’s a little trip down the sketchy part of Memory Lane your parents told you not to visit.

Windows 3.1 didn’t have a blue screen of death: when it totally crashed, you ended up on a black screen. If you were lucky that black screen was the DOS prompt, from which you could launch Windows again. If not, it was time to reset.

There was, however, a blue screen triggerd by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete. This would go on to inspire the design of the Blue Screen of Death to come later.

Interestingly, as a blog post by Raymond Chen points out, the text here was written by none other than future CEO Steve Balmer, back when he ran the Systems Division at Microsoft.

The idea for the first FSP is credited to various people, most notably Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace and the program's first Administrator Milo Perkins. The program operated by permitting people on relief to buy orange stamps equal to their normal food expenditures; for every $1 worth of orange stamps purchased, 50 cents worth of blue stamps were received. Orange stamps could be used to buy any food; blue stamps could only be used to buy food determined by the Department to be surplus.

Over the course of nearly 4 years, the first FSP reached approximately 20 million people at one time or another in nearly half of the counties in the U.S.--peak participation was 4 million--at a total cost of $262 million. The first recipient was Mabel McFiggin of Rochester, New York; the first retailer to redeem the stamps was Joseph Mutolo; and the first retailer caught violating the program was Nick Salzano in October 1939. The program ended "since the conditions that brought the program into being--unmarketable food surpluses and widespread unemployment--no longer existed."

"We got a picture of a gorge, with farm surpluses on one cliff and under-nourished city folks with outstretched hands on the other. We set out to find a practical way to build a bridge across that chasm."
                                               ( Milo Perkins )

The 18 years between the end of the first FSP and the inception of the next were filled with studies, reports, and legislative proposals.

Prominent Senators actively associated with attempts to enact an FSP during this period were: Aiken, La Follette, Humphrey, Kefauver, and Symington. From 1954 on, Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan strove unceasingly to pass food stamp program legislation. On Sept. 21, 1959, P.L. 86-341 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to operate a food stamp system through Jan. 31, 1962.

Mr. and Mrs. Alderson Muncy of Paynesville, West Virginia, were the first food stamp recipients on May 29, 1961. They purchased $95 in food stamps for their 15-person household. In the first food stamp transaction, they bought a can of pork and beans at Henderson's Supermarket. By January 1964, the pilot programs had expanded from eight areas to 43 (40 counties, Detroit, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh) in 22 States with 380,000 participants.

The idea for the first FSP is credited to various people, most notably Secretary of Agriculture Henry Wallace and the program's first Administrator Milo Perkins. The program operated by permitting people on relief to buy orange stamps equal to their normal food expenditures; for every $1 worth of orange stamps purchased, 50 cents worth of blue stamps were received. Orange stamps could be used to buy any food; blue stamps could only be used to buy food determined by the Department to be surplus.

Over the course of nearly 4 years, the first FSP reached approximately 20 million people at one time or another in nearly half of the counties in the U.S.--peak participation was 4 million--at a total cost of $262 million. The first recipient was Mabel McFiggin of Rochester, New York; the first retailer to redeem the stamps was Joseph Mutolo; and the first retailer caught violating the program was Nick Salzano in October 1939. The program ended "since the conditions that brought the program into being--unmarketable food surpluses and widespread unemployment--no longer existed."

"We got a picture of a gorge, with farm surpluses on one cliff and under-nourished city folks with outstretched hands on the other. We set out to find a practical way to build a bridge across that chasm."
                                               ( Milo Perkins )

The 18 years between the end of the first FSP and the inception of the next were filled with studies, reports, and legislative proposals.

Prominent Senators actively associated with attempts to enact an FSP during this period were: Aiken, La Follette, Humphrey, Kefauver, and Symington. From 1954 on, Congresswoman Leonor K. Sullivan strove unceasingly to pass food stamp program legislation. On Sept. 21, 1959, P.L. 86-341 authorized the Secretary of Agriculture to operate a food stamp system through Jan. 31, 1962.

Mr. and Mrs. Alderson Muncy of Paynesville, West Virginia, were the first food stamp recipients on May 29, 1961. They purchased $95 in food stamps for their 15-person household. In the first food stamp transaction, they bought a can of pork and beans at Henderson's Supermarket. By January 1964, the pilot programs had expanded from eight areas to 43 (40 counties, Detroit, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh) in 22 States with 380,000 participants.

It’s iconic, but Microsoft wishes it wasn’t. In the 90s it was as core to the Windows experience as Paint and Solitaire, but these days it’s not seen very often.

I’m talking, of course, about the Blue Screen of Death . Younger PC users have no idea how common this panic-inducing screen once was, or what it meant. Whatever you were working on was gone, and your computer needed to restart, something that took ten minutes at the time.

To this day, the Blue Screen is a recognizable symbol of things not working, but why did it exist in the first place? Here’s a little trip down the sketchy part of Memory Lane your parents told you not to visit.

Windows 3.1 didn’t have a blue screen of death: when it totally crashed, you ended up on a black screen. If you were lucky that black screen was the DOS prompt, from which you could launch Windows again. If not, it was time to reset.

There was, however, a blue screen triggerd by pressing Ctrl+Alt+Delete. This would go on to inspire the design of the Blue Screen of Death to come later.

Interestingly, as a blog post by Raymond Chen points out, the text here was written by none other than future CEO Steve Balmer, back when he ran the Systems Division at Microsoft.

A Short History of the World is a period-piece non-fictional historic work by English author H. G. Wells first published by Cassell & Co, Ltd Publishing in 1922. [1] It was first published in Penguin Books in 1936. It was republished under Penguin Classics in 2006. The book was largely inspired by Wells's earlier 1919 work The Outline of History . [2]

The book is 344 pages in total, [3] summarising the scientific knowledge of the time regarding the history of Earth and life. It starts with its origins , goes on to explain the development of the Earth and life on Earth , [4] reaching primitive thought and the development of humankind from the Cradle of Civilisation . [5] The book ends with the outcome of the First World War , the Russian famine of 1921 , and the League of Nations in 1922. [6] [7] In 1934 Albert Einstein recommended the book for the study of history as a means of interpreting progress in civilisation. [8]


51pM4ITnWmL