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Create or run a macro - Word - support.office.com


As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

Itknowledge24.com - Follow me on Twitter:  http://twitter.com/itknowledge24
- UAC Trust Shortcut 2.0 is on its way. If you have any feedback or questions feel free to 
Contact us .  

No, actually, it isn't.
 >  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.   I shouldn't have thought so, until I saw your first sentence.
 > Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

  Why "fix" something that's not broken.  No patch/service pack can have any effect upon the user's learning ability.
  --
Bruce Chambers

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375
http://www.officeforlawyers.com/howask.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

Itknowledge24.com - Follow me on Twitter:  http://twitter.com/itknowledge24
- UAC Trust Shortcut 2.0 is on its way. If you have any feedback or questions feel free to 
Contact us .  

No, actually, it isn't.
 >  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.   I shouldn't have thought so, until I saw your first sentence.
 > Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

  Why "fix" something that's not broken.  No patch/service pack can have any effect upon the user's learning ability.
  --
Bruce Chambers

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375
http://www.officeforlawyers.com/howask.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

After three months of waiting, Microsoft Office will officially launch for Android tablets today, bringing Word , PowerPoint and Excel to these midsize devices. The apps work much like the iOS versions, letting you create and edit documents, presentations and spreadsheets that will sync with OneDrive so you can work from anywhere.

Also like its iOS counterparts, the Android versions of Word, PowerPoint and Excel let you quickly browse and open recent documents from your OneDrive or Dropbox accounts. You can also create new projects using a variety of handy templates. These templates, by the way, are completely customizable, letting you fill in your own details to create great-looking documents, presentations and spreadsheets.

The preview for Office apps on Android tablets began in November of last year, letting users sample Office as a work in progress, the feedback from which Microsoft says it used to improve the apps for Android users. The company later ramped up to expand the preview to more beta testers in early January.

All of the apps require you to have a Microsoft account (you can sign up from the app itself if you don't have one), but once you're all set up, you'll be able to create and edit documents for free during a one-month trial. After your free trial is up, you can sign up for a subscription to Office 365 with a number of tiered subscription plans for both large and small businesses down to individual users.

Office for Android works on tablets running Android KitKat 4.4, that also have 7-inch screens or larger (sorry, phablet owners). While you can use the final apps on an Android tablet running Lollipop, Microsoft isn't officially supporting that OS quite yet. Look for that to be green-lighted in a subsequent update.

As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

As many of you know, "Run as Administrator" is different from running as an administrator (it has more rights and so some apps require it).  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.  Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

Itknowledge24.com - Follow me on Twitter:  http://twitter.com/itknowledge24
- UAC Trust Shortcut 2.0 is on its way. If you have any feedback or questions feel free to 
Contact us .  

No, actually, it isn't.
 >  Therefore calling it that is just asking for user confusion.   I shouldn't have thought so, until I saw your first sentence.
 > Does anyone know if Microsoft has any plans to rename it in a future patch/service pack to something less confusing (like "Run with full rights" or "Run as System") ?

  Why "fix" something that's not broken.  No patch/service pack can have any effect upon the user's learning ability.
  --
Bruce Chambers

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/555375
http://www.officeforlawyers.com/howask.htm
http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

After three months of waiting, Microsoft Office will officially launch for Android tablets today, bringing Word , PowerPoint and Excel to these midsize devices. The apps work much like the iOS versions, letting you create and edit documents, presentations and spreadsheets that will sync with OneDrive so you can work from anywhere.

Also like its iOS counterparts, the Android versions of Word, PowerPoint and Excel let you quickly browse and open recent documents from your OneDrive or Dropbox accounts. You can also create new projects using a variety of handy templates. These templates, by the way, are completely customizable, letting you fill in your own details to create great-looking documents, presentations and spreadsheets.

The preview for Office apps on Android tablets began in November of last year, letting users sample Office as a work in progress, the feedback from which Microsoft says it used to improve the apps for Android users. The company later ramped up to expand the preview to more beta testers in early January.

All of the apps require you to have a Microsoft account (you can sign up from the app itself if you don't have one), but once you're all set up, you'll be able to create and edit documents for free during a one-month trial. After your free trial is up, you can sign up for a subscription to Office 365 with a number of tiered subscription plans for both large and small businesses down to individual users.

Office for Android works on tablets running Android KitKat 4.4, that also have 7-inch screens or larger (sorry, phablet owners). While you can use the final apps on an Android tablet running Lollipop, Microsoft isn't officially supporting that OS quite yet. Look for that to be green-lighted in a subsequent update.

To save time on tasks you do often, bundle the steps into a macro. First, you record the macro. Then you can run the macro by clicking a button on the Quick Access Toolbar or pressing a combination of keys. It depends on how you set it up.

To run a macro, click the button on the Quick Access Toolbar, press the keyboard shortcut, or you can run the macro from the Macros list.

After you open the Visual Basic Editor, you may want more information about working with Visual Basic for Applications. For more information, click Microsoft Visual Basic Help on the Help menu or press F1.

You can record a sequence of actions, or you can write a macro from scratch by entering Visual Basic for Applications code in the Visual Basic Editor.

Begin recording     To begin recording the macro without assigning it to a button on the Quick Access Toolbar or to a shortcut key, click OK .

The symbol that you choose is displayed in the Quick Access Toolbar. The name that you type is displayed when you point to the symbol.


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