Menu:

Mini-Komix: Mini-Komix: All Ages Album


A minicomic is a creator-published comic book , often photocopied and stapled or with a handmade binding. In the United Kingdom and Europe the term small press comic is equivalent with minicomic, reserved for those publications measuring A6 (105 mm × 148 mm) or less.

Minicomics are a common inexpensive way for those who want to make their own comics on a very small budget, with mostly informal means of distribution . A number of cartoonists — such as Jessica Abel , Julie Doucet , and Adrian Tomine — have started their careers this way and later gone on to more traditional types of publishing, while other established artists — such as Matt Feazell and John Porcellino — continue to publish minicomics as their main means of production.

The term "minicomic" was originally used in the United States and has a somewhat confusing history. Originally, it referred only to size: a digest comic measured 5.5 inches wide by 8.5 inches tall, while a minicomic was 5.5 inches by 4.25 inches. [ citation needed ]

Many minicomics are non-standard comic book sizes for aesthetic reasons, [ citation needed ] or are often connected to graphic design and book print "tricks" to look good. [ citation needed ] Many of these typical sizes are convenient for artists using standard office supplies: a US letter page can be folded in half to make a digest, or in quarters for a minicomic. These comics are generally photocopied, although some are produced in larger quantities using offset printing .

Minicomics typically have no editorial oversight, and both their content and quality vary widely. Many of the creators of minicomics do not expect to make a significant amount of money, or even cover their costs, with the price they charge for their comics. [ citation needed ]

The earliest and most popular comics in mini- and digest sizes—predating not only the term minicomic , but even the standard comic-book format—were the anonymous and pornographic Tijuana bibles of the 1920s.

Fulfilled by Amazon indicates that this item is stored, packed and dispatched from Amazon fulfilment centres. Amazon directly handles delivery, customer service and returns. Fulfilled by Amazon items can be identified with an badge. Orders containing items Fulfilled by Amazon worth Rs.599 or more are eligible for FREE delivery. FBA items may also be eligible for faster delivery (Same-Day, One-Day and Two-Day).

If you're a seller, you can improve your sales by using Fulfilment by Amazon. We invite you to learn more about this programme .

Would you like to tell us about a lower price ?
If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support ?

A minicomic is a creator-published comic book , often photocopied and stapled or with a handmade binding. In the United Kingdom and Europe the term small press comic is equivalent with minicomic, reserved for those publications measuring A6 (105 mm × 148 mm) or less.

Minicomics are a common inexpensive way for those who want to make their own comics on a very small budget, with mostly informal means of distribution . A number of cartoonists — such as Jessica Abel , Julie Doucet , and Adrian Tomine — have started their careers this way and later gone on to more traditional types of publishing, while other established artists — such as Matt Feazell and John Porcellino — continue to publish minicomics as their main means of production.

The term "minicomic" was originally used in the United States and has a somewhat confusing history. Originally, it referred only to size: a digest comic measured 5.5 inches wide by 8.5 inches tall, while a minicomic was 5.5 inches by 4.25 inches. [ citation needed ]

Many minicomics are non-standard comic book sizes for aesthetic reasons, [ citation needed ] or are often connected to graphic design and book print "tricks" to look good. [ citation needed ] Many of these typical sizes are convenient for artists using standard office supplies: a US letter page can be folded in half to make a digest, or in quarters for a minicomic. These comics are generally photocopied, although some are produced in larger quantities using offset printing .

Minicomics typically have no editorial oversight, and both their content and quality vary widely. Many of the creators of minicomics do not expect to make a significant amount of money, or even cover their costs, with the price they charge for their comics. [ citation needed ]

The earliest and most popular comics in mini- and digest sizes—predating not only the term minicomic , but even the standard comic-book format—were the anonymous and pornographic Tijuana bibles of the 1920s.


61yOi8uuydL