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The Bang Bang Club (film) - Wikipedia


The Bang-Bang Club is a 2010 Canadian-South African biographical drama film written and directed by Steven Silver and stars Ryan Phillippe as Greg Marinovich , Malin Åkerman as Robin Comley, Taylor Kitsch as Kevin Carter , Frank Rautenbach as Ken Oosterbroek and Neels Van Jaarsveld as João Silva . They portray the lives of four photojournalists active within the townships of South Africa during the Apartheid period, particularly between 1990 and 1994, from when Nelson Mandela was released from prison to the 1994 elections.

It is a film adaptation of the autobiographical book The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War co-written by Greg Marinovich and João Silva who were part of the group of four photographers known as Bang-Bang Club , the other two members being Kevin Carter and Ken Oosterbroek.

The film tells the remarkable and sometimes harrowing story of four young men and the extremes they went to in order to capture their pictures in the days prior to the downfall of Apartheid in South Africa. [1]

The film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). [2] [3] Entertainment One has distribution rights for Canada. Tribeca Film acquired American distribution rights. It was released theatrically in the US on 22 April 2011. [4] According to The Numbers, the film was only shown in nine theatres in the US where it earned $124,791. [5]

Judith Matloff , a veteran foreign correspondent and Contributing Editor at Columbia Journalism Review explains in her review about the film The Bang Bang Club by Steven Silver that it is the latest Hollywood production to get the role of the conflict correspondent wrong . Matloff has taught a course on conflict reporting, and supervised Master's thesis at the Columbia University , Graduate School of Journalism, New York City. [6] Matloff wrote:

But the reporters and photographers stationed in South Africa at the time were also compassionate human beings who exposed themselves to danger because they wanted to record history. This doesn’t particularly come through in the film. Instead, Silver plays to the Hollywood stereotype of journalists as heartless outsiders. After a fun day taking pictures of black people massacring each other, the lads go back to the white suburbs and party — the implication being that the bloodshed is a game to them. [7]

The Bang Bang Club was a group of four conflict photographers active within the townships of South Africa between 1990 and 1994, during the transition from the apartheid system to democracy . [1] This period saw much black on black factional violence, particularly fighting between ANC and IFP supporters, after the lifting of the bans on both political parties. But groups like the Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging were also involved in violence.

Kevin Carter , Greg Marinovich , Ken Oosterbroek , and João Silva were the four associated with the name. Many photographers, photojournalists , (such as James Nachtwey and Gary Bernard) and television news crews reported also at this time the violence in the townships. A movie about the group , directed by Steven Silver premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2010. [2]

The name "The Bang Bang Club" was born out of an article published in the South African magazine Living . Originally named The Bang Bang Paparazzi , it was changed to "Club" because the members felt the word paparazzi misrepresented their work. The name comes from the culture itself; township residents spoke to the photographers about the "bang-bang" in reference to violence occurring within their communities, but more literally, "bang-bang" refers to the sound of gunfire and is a colloquialism used by conflict photographers . [ citation needed ]

On 18 April 1994, during a firefight between the National Peacekeeping Force and African National Congress supporters in the Thokoza township, friendly fire killed Oosterbroek and seriously injured Marinovich. An inquest into Oosterbroek's death began in 1995. The magistrate ruled that no party should be blamed for the death. In 1999, peacekeeper Brian Mkhize told Marinovich and Silva that he believed that the bullet that killed Oosterbroek had come from the National Peacekeeping Force.

On 23 October 2010, Silva stepped on a land mine while on patrol with U.S. soldiers in Kandahar , Afghanistan and lost both legs below the knee. [3] [4]

Two members won Pulitzer Prizes for their photography. Greg Marinovich won the Pulitzer for Spot News Photography in 1991 for his coverage of the killing of Lindsaye Tshabalala in 1990. Kevin Carter won the Pulitzer for Featured Photography in 1994 for his 1993 photograph of a vulture that appeared to be stalking a starving child in southern Sudan .

Plot Summary
Photojournalists (Ryan Phillippe, Taylor Kitsch, Frank Rautenbach) put themselves in harm's way as they shoot evidence of atrocities committed in the final days of South African apartheid.

Cast: Ryan Phillippe , Taylor Kitsch , Malin Akerman , Frank Rautenbach , Neels Van Jaarsveld , Patrick Lyster , Russel Savadier , Jessica Haines

The Bang-Bang Club is a 2010 Canadian-South African biographical drama film written and directed by Steven Silver and stars Ryan Phillippe as Greg Marinovich , Malin Åkerman as Robin Comley, Taylor Kitsch as Kevin Carter , Frank Rautenbach as Ken Oosterbroek and Neels Van Jaarsveld as João Silva . They portray the lives of four photojournalists active within the townships of South Africa during the Apartheid period, particularly between 1990 and 1994, from when Nelson Mandela was released from prison to the 1994 elections.

It is a film adaptation of the autobiographical book The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War co-written by Greg Marinovich and João Silva who were part of the group of four photographers known as Bang-Bang Club , the other two members being Kevin Carter and Ken Oosterbroek.

The film tells the remarkable and sometimes harrowing story of four young men and the extremes they went to in order to capture their pictures in the days prior to the downfall of Apartheid in South Africa. [1]

The film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). [2] [3] Entertainment One has distribution rights for Canada. Tribeca Film acquired American distribution rights. It was released theatrically in the US on 22 April 2011. [4] According to The Numbers, the film was only shown in nine theatres in the US where it earned $124,791. [5]

Judith Matloff , a veteran foreign correspondent and Contributing Editor at Columbia Journalism Review explains in her review about the film The Bang Bang Club by Steven Silver that it is the latest Hollywood production to get the role of the conflict correspondent wrong . Matloff has taught a course on conflict reporting, and supervised Master's thesis at the Columbia University , Graduate School of Journalism, New York City. [6] Matloff wrote:

But the reporters and photographers stationed in South Africa at the time were also compassionate human beings who exposed themselves to danger because they wanted to record history. This doesn’t particularly come through in the film. Instead, Silver plays to the Hollywood stereotype of journalists as heartless outsiders. After a fun day taking pictures of black people massacring each other, the lads go back to the white suburbs and party — the implication being that the bloodshed is a game to them. [7]

The Bang Bang Club was a group of four conflict photographers active within the townships of South Africa between 1990 and 1994, during the transition from the apartheid system to democracy . [1] This period saw much black on black factional violence, particularly fighting between ANC and IFP supporters, after the lifting of the bans on both political parties. But groups like the Afrikaner Weerstandsbeweging were also involved in violence.

Kevin Carter , Greg Marinovich , Ken Oosterbroek , and João Silva were the four associated with the name. Many photographers, photojournalists , (such as James Nachtwey and Gary Bernard) and television news crews reported also at this time the violence in the townships. A movie about the group , directed by Steven Silver premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 2010. [2]

The name "The Bang Bang Club" was born out of an article published in the South African magazine Living . Originally named The Bang Bang Paparazzi , it was changed to "Club" because the members felt the word paparazzi misrepresented their work. The name comes from the culture itself; township residents spoke to the photographers about the "bang-bang" in reference to violence occurring within their communities, but more literally, "bang-bang" refers to the sound of gunfire and is a colloquialism used by conflict photographers . [ citation needed ]

On 18 April 1994, during a firefight between the National Peacekeeping Force and African National Congress supporters in the Thokoza township, friendly fire killed Oosterbroek and seriously injured Marinovich. An inquest into Oosterbroek's death began in 1995. The magistrate ruled that no party should be blamed for the death. In 1999, peacekeeper Brian Mkhize told Marinovich and Silva that he believed that the bullet that killed Oosterbroek had come from the National Peacekeeping Force.

On 23 October 2010, Silva stepped on a land mine while on patrol with U.S. soldiers in Kandahar , Afghanistan and lost both legs below the knee. [3] [4]

Two members won Pulitzer Prizes for their photography. Greg Marinovich won the Pulitzer for Spot News Photography in 1991 for his coverage of the killing of Lindsaye Tshabalala in 1990. Kevin Carter won the Pulitzer for Featured Photography in 1994 for his 1993 photograph of a vulture that appeared to be stalking a starving child in southern Sudan .

The Bang-Bang Club is a 2010 Canadian-South African biographical drama film written and directed by Steven Silver and stars Ryan Phillippe as Greg Marinovich , Malin Åkerman as Robin Comley, Taylor Kitsch as Kevin Carter , Frank Rautenbach as Ken Oosterbroek and Neels Van Jaarsveld as João Silva . They portray the lives of four photojournalists active within the townships of South Africa during the Apartheid period, particularly between 1990 and 1994, from when Nelson Mandela was released from prison to the 1994 elections.

It is a film adaptation of the autobiographical book The Bang-Bang Club: Snapshots from a Hidden War co-written by Greg Marinovich and João Silva who were part of the group of four photographers known as Bang-Bang Club , the other two members being Kevin Carter and Ken Oosterbroek.

The film tells the remarkable and sometimes harrowing story of four young men and the extremes they went to in order to capture their pictures in the days prior to the downfall of Apartheid in South Africa. [1]

The film had its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF). [2] [3] Entertainment One has distribution rights for Canada. Tribeca Film acquired American distribution rights. It was released theatrically in the US on 22 April 2011. [4] According to The Numbers, the film was only shown in nine theatres in the US where it earned $124,791. [5]

Judith Matloff , a veteran foreign correspondent and Contributing Editor at Columbia Journalism Review explains in her review about the film The Bang Bang Club by Steven Silver that it is the latest Hollywood production to get the role of the conflict correspondent wrong . Matloff has taught a course on conflict reporting, and supervised Master's thesis at the Columbia University , Graduate School of Journalism, New York City. [6] Matloff wrote:

But the reporters and photographers stationed in South Africa at the time were also compassionate human beings who exposed themselves to danger because they wanted to record history. This doesn’t particularly come through in the film. Instead, Silver plays to the Hollywood stereotype of journalists as heartless outsiders. After a fun day taking pictures of black people massacring each other, the lads go back to the white suburbs and party — the implication being that the bloodshed is a game to them. [7]


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