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Captain America: Civil War (2016) - IMDb


Ulysses S. Grant
George B. McClellan
William T. Sherman
Winfield Scott
Henry Halleck
George G. Meade
Joseph Hooker
Benjamin F. Butler
Philip Sheridan
William Rosecrans
George H. Thomas
John Pope
Edward Canby
Nathaniel P. Banks

Robert E. Lee
Joseph E. Johnston
P. G. T. Beauregard
A.S. Johnston
Samuel Cooper
Braxton Bragg
John Bell Hood
Stonewall Jackson
J.E.B. Stuart
Jubal Early
James Longstreet
Edmund K. Smith
John C. Pemberton
Richard Taylor

The war began on April 12, 1861 when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter held by a Union garrison . [2] It lasted four years and devastated the South. The war was fought mostly in the Southern states. After four years of fighting, the Union won the war. After the Union won, slavery was made illegal everywhere in the United States.

Fighting started when the Confederates bombarded Fort Sumter, a Union Army fort. Lincoln then asked the Union states to raise soldiers to fight the Confederates. [5]

The Confederate States claimed that they owned all forts and other federal buildings in the South. Fort Sumter was in South Carolina - one of the Confederate States. However, the fort was controlled by the Union. On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked the fort. They forced the Union soldiers inside the fort to surrender . After this, President Lincoln asked every Union state for volunteers to join the Union Army . Quickly, four more southern slave states joined with the Confederates instead of supplying forces to fight them.

The blockade by the United States Navy stopped the Confederacy from selling its cotton and other goods . It also made it harder for them to buy weapons and military supplies . [6]

Brings together materials from three premier collections: the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Virginia Historical Society, and the Library of Virginia. Among the reconnaissance, sketch, and theater-of-war maps are the detailed battle maps made by Major Jedediah Hotchkiss for Generals Lee and Jackson, General Sherman's Southern military campaigns, and maps taken from diaries, scrapbooks, and manuscripts all available for the first time in one place.

Most of the items presented here are documented in Civil War Maps: An Annotated List of Maps and Atlases in the Library of Congress, compiled by Richard W. Stephenson in 1989. New selections from 2,240 maps and 76 atlases held by the Library will be added monthly.

Civil War Maps contains items from the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Library of Virginia, and the Virginia Historical Society.

This presentation contains approximately 2,240 Civil War maps and charts and 76 atlases and sketchbooks that are held within the Geography and Map Division, 200 maps from the Library of Virginia, and 400 maps from the Virginia Historical Society.

Included here are maps of the whole United States, maps of major regions such as the Eastern or Southern States, maps showing all or parts of more than two states, and maps of the Mississippi River. State maps are also included, with maps of specific battles, cities and towns, and natural features listed alphabetically under each state.

The Library of Virginia's map collection includes about 200 maps relating to the Civil War. Of the maps included in this project, there are maps accompanying a report to the Governor of Virginia, Confederate imprints, a variety of printed and manuscript maps, mostly of Virginia areas, and a small group of field maps of Southwestern Virginia found in books belonging to Major General William W. Loring, C.S.A.

" Civil War " is a 2006–07 Marvel Comics crossover storyline consisting of a seven-issue limited series of the same name written by Mark Millar and penciled by Steve McNiven , and various other tie-in books published by Marvel at the time. The storyline builds upon the events that developed in previous Marvel storylines, particularly " Avengers Disassembled ", " House of M ", and "Decimation" . The tagline for the series is, "Whose Side Are You On?" [1]

The series received polarized reviews by critics but lauded by audiences and was a commercial success. The series is the basis for the Marvel Studios film Captain America: Civil War , which likewise features Captain America and Iron Man in opposition to each other.

The premise of Civil War involves the introduction of a Superhuman Registration Act in the United States. Mark Millar, writer for the story, has said:

Marvel announced in August 2006 that some issues of the main Civil War series would be pushed back several months to accommodate artist Steve McNiven. The schedule had issue #4 being released one month late, in September, while issue #5 was released two months later, in November. Furthermore, various tie-in books including the Civil War: Front Line miniseries and tie-in issues of other comics were delayed several months so as not to reveal any plot developments. [6]

In late November 2006, Marvel announced another delay. Civil War #6, originally scheduled for release on December 20, was pushed back two weeks and released on January 4. Unlike the previous instance, only The Punisher War Journal #2 was delayed. In a final act of rescheduling, Civil War #7 was pushed back two weeks (from January 17 to January 31), [7] and then pushed back again until February 21. [8]

In summary, an explosion in Stamford, Connecticut by the villain Nitro causes the U.S. government to introduce the Superhero Registration Act . Those not adhering to it are deemed unregistered and rogue superheroes. Tony Stark and Reed Richards lead the side of the pro-registration superheroes. Captain America leads the anti-registration side. Spider-Man , initially with Tony Stark, eventually joins the team of Captain America. Goliath is killed by the pro-registration superheroes. Many supervillains join the government in hunting down superheroes.

Ulysses S. Grant
George B. McClellan
William T. Sherman
Winfield Scott
Henry Halleck
George G. Meade
Joseph Hooker
Benjamin F. Butler
Philip Sheridan
William Rosecrans
George H. Thomas
John Pope
Edward Canby
Nathaniel P. Banks

Robert E. Lee
Joseph E. Johnston
P. G. T. Beauregard
A.S. Johnston
Samuel Cooper
Braxton Bragg
John Bell Hood
Stonewall Jackson
J.E.B. Stuart
Jubal Early
James Longstreet
Edmund K. Smith
John C. Pemberton
Richard Taylor

The war began on April 12, 1861 when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter held by a Union garrison . [2] It lasted four years and devastated the South. The war was fought mostly in the Southern states. After four years of fighting, the Union won the war. After the Union won, slavery was made illegal everywhere in the United States.

Fighting started when the Confederates bombarded Fort Sumter, a Union Army fort. Lincoln then asked the Union states to raise soldiers to fight the Confederates. [5]

The Confederate States claimed that they owned all forts and other federal buildings in the South. Fort Sumter was in South Carolina - one of the Confederate States. However, the fort was controlled by the Union. On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked the fort. They forced the Union soldiers inside the fort to surrender . After this, President Lincoln asked every Union state for volunteers to join the Union Army . Quickly, four more southern slave states joined with the Confederates instead of supplying forces to fight them.

The blockade by the United States Navy stopped the Confederacy from selling its cotton and other goods . It also made it harder for them to buy weapons and military supplies . [6]

Brings together materials from three premier collections: the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Virginia Historical Society, and the Library of Virginia. Among the reconnaissance, sketch, and theater-of-war maps are the detailed battle maps made by Major Jedediah Hotchkiss for Generals Lee and Jackson, General Sherman's Southern military campaigns, and maps taken from diaries, scrapbooks, and manuscripts all available for the first time in one place.

Most of the items presented here are documented in Civil War Maps: An Annotated List of Maps and Atlases in the Library of Congress, compiled by Richard W. Stephenson in 1989. New selections from 2,240 maps and 76 atlases held by the Library will be added monthly.

Civil War Maps contains items from the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Library of Virginia, and the Virginia Historical Society.

This presentation contains approximately 2,240 Civil War maps and charts and 76 atlases and sketchbooks that are held within the Geography and Map Division, 200 maps from the Library of Virginia, and 400 maps from the Virginia Historical Society.

Included here are maps of the whole United States, maps of major regions such as the Eastern or Southern States, maps showing all or parts of more than two states, and maps of the Mississippi River. State maps are also included, with maps of specific battles, cities and towns, and natural features listed alphabetically under each state.

The Library of Virginia's map collection includes about 200 maps relating to the Civil War. Of the maps included in this project, there are maps accompanying a report to the Governor of Virginia, Confederate imprints, a variety of printed and manuscript maps, mostly of Virginia areas, and a small group of field maps of Southwestern Virginia found in books belonging to Major General William W. Loring, C.S.A.

" Civil War " is a 2006–07 Marvel Comics crossover storyline consisting of a seven-issue limited series of the same name written by Mark Millar and penciled by Steve McNiven , and various other tie-in books published by Marvel at the time. The storyline builds upon the events that developed in previous Marvel storylines, particularly " Avengers Disassembled ", " House of M ", and "Decimation" . The tagline for the series is, "Whose Side Are You On?" [1]

The series received polarized reviews by critics but lauded by audiences and was a commercial success. The series is the basis for the Marvel Studios film Captain America: Civil War , which likewise features Captain America and Iron Man in opposition to each other.

The premise of Civil War involves the introduction of a Superhuman Registration Act in the United States. Mark Millar, writer for the story, has said:

Marvel announced in August 2006 that some issues of the main Civil War series would be pushed back several months to accommodate artist Steve McNiven. The schedule had issue #4 being released one month late, in September, while issue #5 was released two months later, in November. Furthermore, various tie-in books including the Civil War: Front Line miniseries and tie-in issues of other comics were delayed several months so as not to reveal any plot developments. [6]

In late November 2006, Marvel announced another delay. Civil War #6, originally scheduled for release on December 20, was pushed back two weeks and released on January 4. Unlike the previous instance, only The Punisher War Journal #2 was delayed. In a final act of rescheduling, Civil War #7 was pushed back two weeks (from January 17 to January 31), [7] and then pushed back again until February 21. [8]

In summary, an explosion in Stamford, Connecticut by the villain Nitro causes the U.S. government to introduce the Superhero Registration Act . Those not adhering to it are deemed unregistered and rogue superheroes. Tony Stark and Reed Richards lead the side of the pro-registration superheroes. Captain America leads the anti-registration side. Spider-Man , initially with Tony Stark, eventually joins the team of Captain America. Goliath is killed by the pro-registration superheroes. Many supervillains join the government in hunting down superheroes.

The Civil War is the central event in America's historical consciousness. While the Revolution of 1776-1783 created the United States, the Civil War of 1861-1865 determined what kind of nation it would be. The war resolved two fundamental questions left unresolved by the revolution: whether the United States was to be a dissolvable confederation of sovereign states or an indivisible nation with a sovereign national government; and whether this nation, born of a declaration that all men were created with an equal right to liberty, would continue to exist as the largest slaveholding country in the world.

Northern victory in the war preserved the United States as one nation and ended the institution of slavery that had divided the country from its beginning. But these achievements came at the cost of 625,000 lives--nearly as many American soldiers as died in all the other wars in which this country has fought combined. The American Civil War was the largest and most destructive conflict in the Western world between the end of the Napoleonic Wars in 1815 and the onset of World War I in 1914.

By the spring of 1865 all the principal Confederate armies surrendered, and when Union cavalry captured the fleeing Confederate President Jefferson Davis in Georgia on May 10, 1865, resistance collapsed and the war ended. The long, painful process of rebuilding a united nation free of slavery began.

Ulysses S. Grant
George B. McClellan
William T. Sherman
Winfield Scott
Henry Halleck
George G. Meade
Joseph Hooker
Benjamin F. Butler
Philip Sheridan
William Rosecrans
George H. Thomas
John Pope
Edward Canby
Nathaniel P. Banks

Robert E. Lee
Joseph E. Johnston
P. G. T. Beauregard
A.S. Johnston
Samuel Cooper
Braxton Bragg
John Bell Hood
Stonewall Jackson
J.E.B. Stuart
Jubal Early
James Longstreet
Edmund K. Smith
John C. Pemberton
Richard Taylor

The war began on April 12, 1861 when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter held by a Union garrison . [2] It lasted four years and devastated the South. The war was fought mostly in the Southern states. After four years of fighting, the Union won the war. After the Union won, slavery was made illegal everywhere in the United States.

Fighting started when the Confederates bombarded Fort Sumter, a Union Army fort. Lincoln then asked the Union states to raise soldiers to fight the Confederates. [5]

The Confederate States claimed that they owned all forts and other federal buildings in the South. Fort Sumter was in South Carolina - one of the Confederate States. However, the fort was controlled by the Union. On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked the fort. They forced the Union soldiers inside the fort to surrender . After this, President Lincoln asked every Union state for volunteers to join the Union Army . Quickly, four more southern slave states joined with the Confederates instead of supplying forces to fight them.

The blockade by the United States Navy stopped the Confederacy from selling its cotton and other goods . It also made it harder for them to buy weapons and military supplies . [6]

Ulysses S. Grant
George B. McClellan
William T. Sherman
Winfield Scott
Henry Halleck
George G. Meade
Joseph Hooker
Benjamin F. Butler
Philip Sheridan
William Rosecrans
George H. Thomas
John Pope
Edward Canby
Nathaniel P. Banks

Robert E. Lee
Joseph E. Johnston
P. G. T. Beauregard
A.S. Johnston
Samuel Cooper
Braxton Bragg
John Bell Hood
Stonewall Jackson
J.E.B. Stuart
Jubal Early
James Longstreet
Edmund K. Smith
John C. Pemberton
Richard Taylor

The war began on April 12, 1861 when Confederate forces attacked Fort Sumter held by a Union garrison . [2] It lasted four years and devastated the South. The war was fought mostly in the Southern states. After four years of fighting, the Union won the war. After the Union won, slavery was made illegal everywhere in the United States.

Fighting started when the Confederates bombarded Fort Sumter, a Union Army fort. Lincoln then asked the Union states to raise soldiers to fight the Confederates. [5]

The Confederate States claimed that they owned all forts and other federal buildings in the South. Fort Sumter was in South Carolina - one of the Confederate States. However, the fort was controlled by the Union. On April 12, 1861, Confederate forces attacked the fort. They forced the Union soldiers inside the fort to surrender . After this, President Lincoln asked every Union state for volunteers to join the Union Army . Quickly, four more southern slave states joined with the Confederates instead of supplying forces to fight them.

The blockade by the United States Navy stopped the Confederacy from selling its cotton and other goods . It also made it harder for them to buy weapons and military supplies . [6]

Brings together materials from three premier collections: the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Virginia Historical Society, and the Library of Virginia. Among the reconnaissance, sketch, and theater-of-war maps are the detailed battle maps made by Major Jedediah Hotchkiss for Generals Lee and Jackson, General Sherman's Southern military campaigns, and maps taken from diaries, scrapbooks, and manuscripts all available for the first time in one place.

Most of the items presented here are documented in Civil War Maps: An Annotated List of Maps and Atlases in the Library of Congress, compiled by Richard W. Stephenson in 1989. New selections from 2,240 maps and 76 atlases held by the Library will be added monthly.

Civil War Maps contains items from the Library of Congress Geography and Map Division, the Library of Virginia, and the Virginia Historical Society.

This presentation contains approximately 2,240 Civil War maps and charts and 76 atlases and sketchbooks that are held within the Geography and Map Division, 200 maps from the Library of Virginia, and 400 maps from the Virginia Historical Society.

Included here are maps of the whole United States, maps of major regions such as the Eastern or Southern States, maps showing all or parts of more than two states, and maps of the Mississippi River. State maps are also included, with maps of specific battles, cities and towns, and natural features listed alphabetically under each state.

The Library of Virginia's map collection includes about 200 maps relating to the Civil War. Of the maps included in this project, there are maps accompanying a report to the Governor of Virginia, Confederate imprints, a variety of printed and manuscript maps, mostly of Virginia areas, and a small group of field maps of Southwestern Virginia found in books belonging to Major General William W. Loring, C.S.A.


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